3 improve grammar
source | link

Yes and no.

No

Docker is not virtualisation: It uses namespaces, chroot, cgroups, etc; docker adds no extra virtualisation on top of Linux. Therefore: as docker uses chroot, and is not virtualisation, then chroot is also not virtualisation. However is can be used for the same things.

This all depends on definitions, if virtualisation is how it works, then no, if it is what it dose then sort of.

Yes

Unix including Gnu/Linux is a type of virtualisation (As is Microsoft's NT): The OS visualises the hardware. Each process gets to run as if on a dedicated hardware. (Plus inter-process communication etc.)

Yes and no.

No

Docker is not virtualisation: It uses namespaces, chroot, cgroups, etc; docker adds no extra virtualisation on top of Linux. Therefore as docker uses chroot, and is not then chroot is not. However is can be used for the same things.

This all depends on definitions, if virtualisation is how it works, then no, if it is what it dose then sort of.

Yes

Unix including Gnu/Linux is a type of virtualisation (As is Microsoft's NT): The OS visualises the hardware. Each process gets to run as if on a dedicated hardware. (Plus inter-process communication etc.)

Yes and no.

No

Docker is not virtualisation: It uses namespaces, chroot, cgroups, etc; docker adds no extra virtualisation on top of Linux. Therefore: as docker uses chroot, and is not virtualisation, then chroot is also not virtualisation. However is can be used for the same things.

This all depends on definitions, if virtualisation is how it works, then no, if it is what it dose then sort of.

Yes

Unix including Gnu/Linux is a type of virtualisation (As is Microsoft's NT): The OS visualises the hardware. Each process gets to run as if on a dedicated hardware. (Plus inter-process communication etc.)

2 minor grammar correction
source | link

Yes and no.

No

Docker is not virtualisation: It (as you know) uses namespaces, chroot, cgroups, etc; docker adds no extra virtualisation on top of Linux. Therefore as docker uses chroot, and is not then chroot is not. However is can be used for the same things.

This all depends on definitions, if virtualisation is how it works, then no, if it is what it dose then sort of.

Yes

Unix including Gnu/Linux is a type of virtualisation (As is Microsoft's NT): The OS visualises the hardware. Each process gets to run as if on a dedicated hardware. (Plus inter-process communication etc.)

Yes and no.

No

Docker is not virtualisation: It (as you know) uses namespaces, chroot, cgroups, etc; docker adds no extra virtualisation on top of Linux. Therefore as docker uses chroot, and is not then chroot is not. However is can be used for the same things.

This all depends on definitions, if virtualisation is how it works, then no, if it is what it dose then sort of.

Yes

Unix including Gnu/Linux is a type of virtualisation (As is Microsoft's NT): The OS visualises the hardware. Each process gets to run as if on a dedicated hardware. (Plus inter-process communication etc.)

Yes and no.

No

Docker is not virtualisation: It uses namespaces, chroot, cgroups, etc; docker adds no extra virtualisation on top of Linux. Therefore as docker uses chroot, and is not then chroot is not. However is can be used for the same things.

This all depends on definitions, if virtualisation is how it works, then no, if it is what it dose then sort of.

Yes

Unix including Gnu/Linux is a type of virtualisation (As is Microsoft's NT): The OS visualises the hardware. Each process gets to run as if on a dedicated hardware. (Plus inter-process communication etc.)

1
source | link

Yes and no.

No

Docker is not virtualisation: It (as you know) uses namespaces, chroot, cgroups, etc; docker adds no extra virtualisation on top of Linux. Therefore as docker uses chroot, and is not then chroot is not. However is can be used for the same things.

This all depends on definitions, if virtualisation is how it works, then no, if it is what it dose then sort of.

Yes

Unix including Gnu/Linux is a type of virtualisation (As is Microsoft's NT): The OS visualises the hardware. Each process gets to run as if on a dedicated hardware. (Plus inter-process communication etc.)