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An alternative (or complementary) tactic over firewalling is following the golden rule of not having unnecessary services /configurations, and so not having the Mysql answering in a public address in the first place.

The advised strategy here is binding/making the Mysql daemon / service only listen to the private ip address.

Edit my.cnfmy.cnf and use :

bind-address=10.64.30.117

As you mention ip addresses change, as an alternative, you can use this directive with a host name defined in /etc/hosts and change it before (re)starting Mysql. (or use a private DNS name of it exists)

Restart then the Mysql daemon, and the device won't listen for requests on other IP addresses anymore.

PS As a bonus, in this way you won't also be worried about changes in the public IP address. As for private IP addresses changing that has to be addressed either coercing the network setup, or with a virtual IP address or changing configuration files on the fly.

PPS this principle is applicable to other services like Tomcat behind a Web server. You can also bind services to the localhost only when the client resides in the same machine /VM

Also for dealing with IP address changes, see related question Method for acting on IP address change from the ISP?

An alternative (or complementary) tactic over firewalling is following the golden rule of not having unnecessary services /configurations, and so not having the Mysql answering in a public address in the first place.

The advised strategy here is binding/making the Mysql daemon / service only listen to the private ip address.

Edit my.cnf and use :

bind-address=10.64.30.117

As you mention ip addresses change, as an alternative, you can use this directive with a host name defined in /etc/hosts and change it before (re)starting Mysql. (or use a private DNS name of it exists)

Restart then the Mysql daemon, and the device won't listen for requests on other IP addresses anymore.

PS As a bonus, in this way you won't also be worried about changes in the public IP address. As for private IP addresses changing that has to be addressed either coercing the network setup, or with a virtual IP address or changing configuration files on the fly.

PPS this principle is applicable to other services like Tomcat behind a Web server. You can also bind services to the localhost only when the client resides in the same machine /VM

An alternative (or complementary) tactic over firewalling is following the golden rule of not having unnecessary services /configurations, and so not having the Mysql answering in a public address in the first place.

The advised strategy here is binding/making the Mysql daemon / service only listen to the private ip address.

Edit my.cnf and use :

bind-address=10.64.30.117

As you mention ip addresses change, as an alternative, you can use this directive with a host name defined in /etc/hosts and change it before (re)starting Mysql. (or use a private DNS name of it exists)

Restart then the Mysql daemon, and the device won't listen for requests on other IP addresses anymore.

PS As a bonus, in this way you won't also be worried about changes in the public IP address. As for private IP addresses changing that has to be addressed either coercing the network setup, or with a virtual IP address or changing configuration files on the fly.

PPS this principle is applicable to other services like Tomcat behind a Web server. You can also bind services to the localhost only when the client resides in the same machine /VM

Also for dealing with IP address changes, see related question Method for acting on IP address change from the ISP?

4 added 205 characters in body
source | link

An alternative (or complementary) tactic over firewalling is following the golden rule of not having unnecessary services /configurations, and so not having the Mysql answering in a public address in the first place.

The advised strategy here is binding/making the Mysql daemon / service only listen to the private ip address.

Edit my.cnf and use :

bind-address=10.64.30.117

As you mention ip addresses change, as an alternative, you can use this directive with a host name defined in /etc/hosts and change it before (re)starting Mysql. (or use a private DNS name of it exists)

Restart then the Mysql daemon, and the device won't listen for requests on other IP addresses anymore.

PS As a bonus, in this way you won't also be worried about changes in the public IP address. As for private IP addresses changing that has to be addressed either coercing the network setup, or with a virtual IP address or changing configuration files on the fly.

PPS this principle is applicable to other services like Tomcat behind a Web server. You can also bind services to the localhost only when the client resides in the same machine /VM

An alternative (or complementary) tactic over firewalling is following the golden rule of not having unnecessary services /configurations, and so not having the Mysql answering in a public address in the first place.

The advised strategy here is binding/making the Mysql daemon / service only listen to the private ip address.

Edit my.cnf and use :

bind-address=10.64.30.117

Restart then the Mysql daemon, and the device won't listen for requests on other IP addresses anymore.

PS As a bonus, in this way you won't also be worried about changes in the public IP address. As for private IP addresses changing that has to be addressed either coercing the network setup, or with a virtual IP address or changing configuration files on the fly.

PPS this principle is applicable to other services like Tomcat behind a Web server. You can also bind services to the localhost only when the client resides in the same machine /VM

An alternative (or complementary) tactic over firewalling is following the golden rule of not having unnecessary services /configurations, and so not having the Mysql answering in a public address in the first place.

The advised strategy here is binding/making the Mysql daemon / service only listen to the private ip address.

Edit my.cnf and use :

bind-address=10.64.30.117

As you mention ip addresses change, as an alternative, you can use this directive with a host name defined in /etc/hosts and change it before (re)starting Mysql. (or use a private DNS name of it exists)

Restart then the Mysql daemon, and the device won't listen for requests on other IP addresses anymore.

PS As a bonus, in this way you won't also be worried about changes in the public IP address. As for private IP addresses changing that has to be addressed either coercing the network setup, or with a virtual IP address or changing configuration files on the fly.

PPS this principle is applicable to other services like Tomcat behind a Web server. You can also bind services to the localhost only when the client resides in the same machine /VM

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An alternative (or complementary) tactic over firewalling is following the golden rule of not having unnecessary services /configurations, and so not having the Mysql answering in a public address in the first place.

The advised strategy here is binding/making the Mysql daemon / service only listen to the private ip address.

Edit my.cnf and use :

bind-address=10.64.30.117

Restart then the Mysql daemon, and the device won't listen for requests on other IP addresses anymore.

PS As a bonus, in this way you won't also be worried about changes in the public IP address. As for private IP addresses changing that has to be addressed either coercing the network setup, or with a virtual IP address or changing configuration files on the fly.

PPS this principle is applicable to other services like Tomcat behind a Web server. You can also bind services to the localhost only when the client resides in the same machine /VM

An alternative (or complementary) tactic over firewalling is following the golden rule of not having unnecessary services /configurations, and so not having the Mysql answering in a public address in the first place.

The advised strategy here is binding/making the Mysql daemon / service only listen to the private ip address.

Edit my.cnf and use :

bind-address=10.64.30.117

Restart then the Mysql daemon, and the device won't listen for requests on other IP addresses anymore.

PS As a bonus, in this way you won't also be worried about changes in the public IP address.

PPS this principle is applicable to other services like Tomcat behind a Web server. You can also bind services to the localhost only when the client resides in the same machine /VM

An alternative (or complementary) tactic over firewalling is following the golden rule of not having unnecessary services /configurations, and so not having the Mysql answering in a public address in the first place.

The advised strategy here is binding/making the Mysql daemon / service only listen to the private ip address.

Edit my.cnf and use :

bind-address=10.64.30.117

Restart then the Mysql daemon, and the device won't listen for requests on other IP addresses anymore.

PS As a bonus, in this way you won't also be worried about changes in the public IP address. As for private IP addresses changing that has to be addressed either coercing the network setup, or with a virtual IP address or changing configuration files on the fly.

PPS this principle is applicable to other services like Tomcat behind a Web server. You can also bind services to the localhost only when the client resides in the same machine /VM

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