4 edited body
source | link

A new version of GNU sed supports the -z option.

Normally, sed reads a line by reading a string of characters up to the end-of-line character (new line or carriage return).
The GNU version of sed added a feature in version 4.2.2 to use the "NULL" character instead. This can be useful if you have files that use the NULL as a record separator. Some GNU utilities can genertaegenerate output that uses a NULL instead a new line, such as "find . -print0" or "grep -lZ".

You can use this option when you want sed to work over different lines.

echo 'claudio
antonio
claudio
michele' | sed -z 's/claudio/claudia/'

returns

claudia
antonio
claudio
michele

A new version of GNU sed supports the -z option.

Normally, sed reads a line by reading a string of characters up to the end-of-line character (new line or carriage return).
The GNU version of sed added a feature in version 4.2.2 to use the "NULL" character instead. This can be useful if you have files that use the NULL as a record separator. Some GNU utilities can genertae output that uses a NULL instead a new line, such as "find . -print0" or "grep -lZ".

You can use this option when you want sed to work over different lines.

echo 'claudio
antonio
claudio
michele' | sed -z 's/claudio/claudia/'

returns

claudia
antonio
claudio
michele

A new version of GNU sed supports the -z option.

Normally, sed reads a line by reading a string of characters up to the end-of-line character (new line or carriage return).
The GNU version of sed added a feature in version 4.2.2 to use the "NULL" character instead. This can be useful if you have files that use the NULL as a record separator. Some GNU utilities can generate output that uses a NULL instead a new line, such as "find . -print0" or "grep -lZ".

You can use this option when you want sed to work over different lines.

echo 'claudio
antonio
claudio
michele' | sed -z 's/claudio/claudia/'

returns

claudia
antonio
claudio
michele
3 added 1 character in body
source | link

A new version of GNU sed supports the -z option.

Normally, sed reads a line by reading a string of characters up to the end-of-line character (new line or carriage return).
The GNU version of sed added a feature in version 4.2.2 to use the "NULL" character instead. This can be useful if you have files that use the NULL as a record separator. Some GNU utilities can genertae output that uses a NULL instead a new line, such as "find . -print0" or "grep -lZ".

You can use this option when you want sed to workoverwork over different lines.

echo 'claudio
antonio
claudio
michele' | sed -z 's/claudio/claudia/'

returns

claudia
antonio
claudio
michele

A new version of GNU sed supports the -z option.

Normally, sed reads a line by reading a string of characters up to the end-of-line character (new line or carriage return).
The GNU version of sed added a feature in version 4.2.2 to use the "NULL" character instead. This can be useful if you have files that use the NULL as a record separator. Some GNU utilities can genertae output that uses a NULL instead a new line, such as "find . -print0" or "grep -lZ".

You can use this option when you want sed to workover different lines.

echo 'claudio
antonio
claudio
michele' | sed -z 's/claudio/claudia/'

returns

claudia
antonio
claudio
michele

A new version of GNU sed supports the -z option.

Normally, sed reads a line by reading a string of characters up to the end-of-line character (new line or carriage return).
The GNU version of sed added a feature in version 4.2.2 to use the "NULL" character instead. This can be useful if you have files that use the NULL as a record separator. Some GNU utilities can genertae output that uses a NULL instead a new line, such as "find . -print0" or "grep -lZ".

You can use this option when you want sed to work over different lines.

echo 'claudio
antonio
claudio
michele' | sed -z 's/claudio/claudia/'

returns

claudia
antonio
claudio
michele
2 GNU
source | link

A new version of GNU sed supports the -z-z option.

Normally, sed reads a line by reading a string of characters up to the end-of-line character (new line or carriage return).
The GNU version of sed added a feature in version 4.2.2 to use the "NULL" character instead. This can be useful if you have files that use the NULL as a record separator. Some GNU utilities can genertae output that uses a NULL instead a new line, such as "find . -print0" or "grep -lZ".

You can use this option when you want sed to workover different lines.

echo 'claudio
antonio
claudio
michele' | sed -z 's/claudio/claudia/'

returns

claudia
antonio
claudio
michele

A new version of sed supports the -z option.

Normally, sed reads a line by reading a string of characters up to the end-of-line character (new line or carriage return).
The GNU version of sed added a feature in version 4.2.2 to use the "NULL" character instead. This can be useful if you have files that use the NULL as a record separator. Some GNU utilities can genertae output that uses a NULL instead a new line, such as "find . -print0" or "grep -lZ".

You can use this option when you want sed to workover different lines.

echo 'claudio
antonio
claudio
michele' | sed -z 's/claudio/claudia/'

returns

claudia
antonio
claudio
michele

A new version of GNU sed supports the -z option.

Normally, sed reads a line by reading a string of characters up to the end-of-line character (new line or carriage return).
The GNU version of sed added a feature in version 4.2.2 to use the "NULL" character instead. This can be useful if you have files that use the NULL as a record separator. Some GNU utilities can genertae output that uses a NULL instead a new line, such as "find . -print0" or "grep -lZ".

You can use this option when you want sed to workover different lines.

echo 'claudio
antonio
claudio
michele' | sed -z 's/claudio/claudia/'

returns

claudia
antonio
claudio
michele
1
source | link