4 deleted 4 characters in body
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It's an awkward way to check if PS1 is bash's default, or if it was customized by the user in ~/.bashrc (or in any of the /etc/profile, /etc/profile.d/* or ~/.bash_profile files in the case of a login shell).

In the former case, PS1 will be set to the ugly and annoying [user@host /long/path/to/hell]$last_path_elem]$; in the latter case, it will be left as is.

Notice that on RedHat /etc/bashrc is sourced explicitly from the default ~/.bashrc and ~/.bash_profile installed from /etc/skel; do not confuse /etc/bashrc with /etc/bash.bashrc which is sourced before ~/.bashrc on some systems (eg. Debian).

It's an awkward way to check if PS1 is bash's default, or if it was customized by the user in ~/.bashrc (or in any of the /etc/profile, /etc/profile.d/* or ~/.bash_profile files in the case of a login shell).

In the former case, PS1 will be set to the ugly and annoying [user@host /long/path/to/hell]$; in the latter case, it will be left as is.

Notice that on RedHat /etc/bashrc is sourced explicitly from the default ~/.bashrc and ~/.bash_profile installed from /etc/skel; do not confuse /etc/bashrc with /etc/bash.bashrc which is sourced before ~/.bashrc on some systems (eg. Debian).

It's an awkward way to check if PS1 is bash's default, or if it was customized by the user in ~/.bashrc (or in any of the /etc/profile, /etc/profile.d/* or ~/.bash_profile files in the case of a login shell).

In the former case, PS1 will be set to the ugly and annoying [user@host last_path_elem]$; in the latter case, it will be left as is.

Notice that on RedHat /etc/bashrc is sourced explicitly from the default ~/.bashrc and ~/.bash_profile installed from /etc/skel; do not confuse /etc/bashrc with /etc/bash.bashrc which is sourced before ~/.bashrc on some systems (eg. Debian).

3 added 129 characters in body
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It's an awkward way to check if PS1 is bash's default, or if it was customized by the user in ~/.bashrc (or in any of the /etc/profile, /etc/profile.d/* or ~/.bash_profile files in the case of a login shell).

In the former case, PS1 will be set to the ugly and annoying [user@host /long/path/to/hell]$; in the latter case, it will be left as is.

Notice that on RedHat /etc/bashrc is sourced explicitly from the default ~/.bashrc and ~/.bash_profile installed from /etc/skel; do not confuse /etc/bashrc with /etc/bash.bashrc which is sourced before ~/.bashrc on some systems (eg. Debian).

It's an awkward way to check if PS1 is bash's default, or if it was customized by the user in ~/.bashrc.

In the former case, PS1 will be set to the ugly and annoying [user@host /long/path/to/hell]$; in the latter case, it will be left as is.

Notice that on RedHat /etc/bashrc is sourced explicitly from the default ~/.bashrc installed from /etc/skel; do not confuse /etc/bashrc with /etc/bash.bashrc which is sourced before ~/.bashrc on some systems (eg. Debian).

It's an awkward way to check if PS1 is bash's default, or if it was customized by the user in ~/.bashrc (or in any of the /etc/profile, /etc/profile.d/* or ~/.bash_profile files in the case of a login shell).

In the former case, PS1 will be set to the ugly and annoying [user@host /long/path/to/hell]$; in the latter case, it will be left as is.

Notice that on RedHat /etc/bashrc is sourced explicitly from the default ~/.bashrc and ~/.bash_profile installed from /etc/skel; do not confuse /etc/bashrc with /etc/bash.bashrc which is sourced before ~/.bashrc on some systems (eg. Debian).

2 added 118 characters in body
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It's an awkward way to check if PS1 is bash's default, or if it was customized by the user in ~/.bashrc.

In the former case, PS1 will be set to the ugly and annoying [user@host /long/path/to/hell]$; in the latter case, it will be left as is.

Notice that on RedHat /etc/bashrc is sourced explicitly from the default ~/.bashrc installed from /etc/skel; do not confuse /etc/bashrc with /etc/bash.bashrc which is sourced before ~/.bashrc on some systems (eg. DebianDebian).

It's an awkward way to check if PS1 is bash's default, or if it was customized by the user in ~/.bashrc.

In the former case, PS1 will be set to the ugly annoying [user@host /long/path/to/hell]$; in the latter case, it will be left as is.

Notice that on RedHat /etc/bashrc is sourced explicitly from the default ~/.bashrc installed from /etc/skel; do not confuse /etc/bashrc with /etc/bash.bashrc which is sourced before ~/.bashrc on some systems (eg. Debian).

It's an awkward way to check if PS1 is bash's default, or if it was customized by the user in ~/.bashrc.

In the former case, PS1 will be set to the ugly and annoying [user@host /long/path/to/hell]$; in the latter case, it will be left as is.

Notice that on RedHat /etc/bashrc is sourced explicitly from the default ~/.bashrc installed from /etc/skel; do not confuse /etc/bashrc with /etc/bash.bashrc which is sourced before ~/.bashrc on some systems (eg. Debian).

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