6 added 3 characters in body
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The point is, there is not only one place where the certificate is installed, but two, hence the source of the confusion. Or depending on the setup, even two different certificates (but most usually it is the same certificate installed in two places).

To get to the specifics, there are in fact two sets of certificate "stores", the applicational certificate keystore from Java (backend), and the certificate configurations from the system/web server (frontend).

Usually, when installing a new certificate, it has to be updated on both places.

Since you already have shown us you are dealing with the Java keystore (e.g. using the keytool command), you also need to look to the system/webserver side too.

Making the supposition the frontend browserweb server is Apache, usually ssl.conf or the vhost configuration is pointing to the location in the filesystem of the certificate using the directive SSLCertificateFile (and SSLCertificateKeyFile).

Nevertheless, supposing you are from the development team, I advise having a friendly chat with the local system administrators. They should be able to point out how certificates are configured on the web server/Linux side.

PS Be aware the web frontend and applicacional backend can either be on the same VM/server, or in a different VM/server.

The point is there is not only one place where the certificate is installed, but two, hence the source of the confusion. Or depending on the setup, even two different certificates (but most usually it is the same certificate installed in two places).

To get to the specifics, there are in fact two sets of certificate "stores", the applicational certificate keystore from Java (backend), and the certificate configurations from the system/web server (frontend).

Usually, when installing a new certificate, it has to be updated on both places.

Since you already have shown us you are dealing with the Java keystore (e.g. using the keytool command), you also need to look to the system/webserver side too.

Making the supposition the frontend browser is Apache, usually ssl.conf or the vhost configuration is pointing to the location in the filesystem of the certificate using the directive SSLCertificateFile (and SSLCertificateKeyFile).

Nevertheless, supposing you are from the development team, I advise having a friendly chat with the local system administrators. They should be able to point out how certificates are configured on the web server/Linux side.

PS Be aware the web frontend and applicacional backend can either be on the same VM/server, or in a different VM/server.

The point is, there is not only one place where the certificate is installed, but two, hence the source of the confusion. Or depending on the setup, even two different certificates (but most usually it is the same certificate installed in two places).

To get to the specifics, there are in fact two sets of certificate "stores", the applicational certificate keystore from Java (backend), and the certificate configurations from the system/web server (frontend).

Usually, when installing a new certificate, it has to be updated on both places.

Since you already have shown us you are dealing with the Java keystore (e.g. using the keytool command), you also need to look to the system/webserver side too.

Making the supposition the frontend web server is Apache, usually ssl.conf or the vhost configuration is pointing to the location in the filesystem of the certificate using the directive SSLCertificateFile (and SSLCertificateKeyFile).

Nevertheless, supposing you are from the development team, I advise having a friendly chat with the local system administrators. They should be able to point out how certificates are configured on the web server/Linux side.

PS Be aware the web frontend and applicacional backend can either be on the same VM/server, or in a different VM/server.

5 added 11 characters in body
source | link

The point is there is not only one place where the certificate is installed, but two, hence the source of the confusion. Or depending on the setup, even two different certificates (but most usually it is the same certificate installed in two places).

To get to the specifics, there are in fact two sets of certificate "stores", the applicational certificate keystore from Java (backend), and the certificate configurations from the system/web server (frontend).

Usually, when you installinstalling a new certificate, it has to be updated on both places.

Since you already have shown us you are dealing with the Java keystore (e.g. using the keytool command), you also need to look to the system/webserver side too.

Making the supposition the frontend browser is Apache, usually ssl.conf or the vhost configuration is pointing to the location in the filesystem of the certificate using the directive SSLCertificateFile (and SSLCertificateKeyFile).

Nevertheless, supposing you are from the development team, I advise having a friendly chat with the local(s) system administrators. They should be able to point out how certificates are configured on the Linuxweb server/Linux side.

PS Be aware the web frontend and applicacional backend can either be on the same VM/server, or in a different VM/server.

The point is there is not only one place where the certificate is installed, but two, hence the source of the confusion. Or depending on the setup, even two different certificates (but most usually it is the same certificate installed in two places).

To get to the specifics, there are in fact two sets of certificate "stores", the applicational certificate keystore from Java (backend), and the certificate configurations from the system/web server (frontend).

Usually, when you install a new certificate, it has to be updated on both places.

Since you already have shown us you are dealing with the Java keystore, you also need to look to the system/webserver side too.

Making the supposition the frontend browser is Apache, usually ssl.conf or the vhost configuration is pointing to the location in the filesystem of the certificate using the directive SSLCertificateFile (and SSLCertificateKeyFile).

Nevertheless, supposing you are from the development team, I advise having a friendly chat with the local(s) system administrators. They should be able to point out how certificates are configured on the Linux side.

PS Be aware the web frontend and applicacional backend can either be on the same VM/server, or in a different VM/server.

The point is there is not only one place where the certificate is installed, but two, hence the source of the confusion. Or depending on the setup, even two different certificates (but most usually it is the same certificate installed in two places).

To get to the specifics, there are in fact two sets of certificate "stores", the applicational certificate keystore from Java (backend), and the certificate configurations from the system/web server (frontend).

Usually, when installing a new certificate, it has to be updated on both places.

Since you already have shown us you are dealing with the Java keystore (e.g. using the keytool command), you also need to look to the system/webserver side too.

Making the supposition the frontend browser is Apache, usually ssl.conf or the vhost configuration is pointing to the location in the filesystem of the certificate using the directive SSLCertificateFile (and SSLCertificateKeyFile).

Nevertheless, supposing you are from the development team, I advise having a friendly chat with the local system administrators. They should be able to point out how certificates are configured on the web server/Linux side.

PS Be aware the web frontend and applicacional backend can either be on the same VM/server, or in a different VM/server.

4 added 106 characters in body
source | link

The point is there is not only one place where the certificate is installed, but two, hence the source of the confusion. Or depending on the setup, even two different certificates (but most usually it is the same certificate installed in two places).

To get to the specifics, there are in fact two sets of certificate "stores", the applicational certificate keystore from Java (backend), and the certificate configurations from the system/web server (frontend).

Usually, when you install a new certificate, it has to be updated on both places.

Since you already have shown us you are dealing with the Java keystore, you also need to look to the system/webserver side too.

Making the supposition the frontend browser is Apache, usually ssl.conf or the vhost configuration is pointing to the location in the filesystem of the certificate using the directive SSLCertificateFile (and SSLCertificateKeyFile).

Nevertheless, supposing you are from the development team, I advise having a friendly chat with the local(s) system administrators. They should be able to point out how certificates are configured on the Linux side.

PS Be aware the web frontend and applicacional backend can either be on the same VM/server, or in a different VM/server.

The point is there is not only one place where the certificate is installed, but two, hence the source of the confusion. Or depending on the setup, even two different certificates (but most usually it is the same certificate installed in two places).

To get to the specifics, there are in fact two sets of certificate "stores", the applicational certificate keystore from Java (backend), and the certificate configurations from the system/web server (frontend).

Usually, when you install a new certificate, it has to be updated on both places.

Since you already have shown us you are dealing with the Java keystore, you also need to look to the system/webserver side too.

Making the supposition the frontend browser is Apache, usually ssl.conf or the vhost configuration is pointing to the location in the filesystem of the certificate using the directive SSLCertificateFile (and SSLCertificateKeyFile).

Nevertheless, supposing you are from the development team, I advise having a friendly chat with the local(s) system administrators. They should be able to point out how certificates are configured on the Linux side.

The point is there is not only one place where the certificate is installed, but two, hence the source of the confusion. Or depending on the setup, even two different certificates (but most usually it is the same certificate installed in two places).

To get to the specifics, there are in fact two sets of certificate "stores", the applicational certificate keystore from Java (backend), and the certificate configurations from the system/web server (frontend).

Usually, when you install a new certificate, it has to be updated on both places.

Since you already have shown us you are dealing with the Java keystore, you also need to look to the system/webserver side too.

Making the supposition the frontend browser is Apache, usually ssl.conf or the vhost configuration is pointing to the location in the filesystem of the certificate using the directive SSLCertificateFile (and SSLCertificateKeyFile).

Nevertheless, supposing you are from the development team, I advise having a friendly chat with the local(s) system administrators. They should be able to point out how certificates are configured on the Linux side.

PS Be aware the web frontend and applicacional backend can either be on the same VM/server, or in a different VM/server.

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