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I would like to create a bootable Linux ISO on a USB drive under Debian 9. I found that the ISO is only bootable if it has been written to the "general" pathdisk /dev/sdX/dev/XdY. If the ISO is written to a specific partition, e.g. /dev/sdd1, then it is not bootable. What is the technical reason behind this?

It works after writing the ISO to a partition and deleting the partition afterwards using Gnome-Disk, this does not delete the file, but makes it (or the drive?)disk bootable.

I would like to create a bootable Linux ISO on a USB drive under Debian 9. I found that the ISO is only bootable if it has been written to the "general" path /dev/sdX. If the ISO is written to a specific partition, e.g. /dev/sdd1, then it is not bootable. What is the technical reason behind this?

It works after writing the ISO to a partition and deleting the partition afterwards using Gnome-Disk, this does not delete the file, but makes it (or the drive?) bootable.

I would like to create a bootable Linux ISO on a USB drive under Debian 9. I found that the ISO is only bootable if it has been written to the disk /dev/XdY. If the ISO is written to a specific partition, e.g. /dev/sdd1, then it is not bootable. What is the technical reason behind this?

It works after writing the ISO to a partition and deleting the partition afterwards using Gnome-Disk, this does not delete the file, but makes the disk bootable.

3 deleted 20 characters in body
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I would like to create a bootable Linux ISO on a USB drive under Debian 9. I found that the ISO is, only, bootable if it has been written to the "general" path /dev/sdX. If the ISO has beenis written to a specific partition, e.g. /dev/sdd1, then it is not going to be bootable. What is the technical reason behind thatthis?

It works after writing the ISO to a partition and deleting the partition afterwards using Gnome-Disk, this does not delete the file, but makes it (or the drive?) bootable.

I would like to create a bootable Linux ISO on a USB drive under Debian 9. I found that the ISO is, only, bootable if it has been written to the "general" path /dev/sdX. If the ISO has been written to a specific partition, e.g. /dev/sdd1, then it is not going to be bootable. What is the technical reason behind that?

It works after writing the ISO to a partition and deleting the partition afterwards using Gnome-Disk, this does not delete the file, but makes it (or the drive?) bootable.

I would like to create a bootable Linux ISO on a USB drive under Debian 9. I found that the ISO is only bootable if it has been written to the "general" path /dev/sdX. If the ISO is written to a specific partition, e.g. /dev/sdd1, then it is not bootable. What is the technical reason behind this?

It works after writing the ISO to a partition and deleting the partition afterwards using Gnome-Disk, this does not delete the file, but makes it (or the drive?) bootable.

2 Stylistic and grammar edits
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I wantwould like to create a bootable Linux ISO on a USB drive under Debian 9 and. I found that that the ISO is bootable, only, bootable if it'sit has been written to the "general" path /dev/sdX. If If the ISO ishas been written to a specific partition, e.g. /dev/sdd1, then it'sit is not going to be bootable. What is the technical reason behind thisthat?

It even works when firstafter writing the ISO to a partition and deleting the partition afterwards using Gnome-Disk, this does not delete the file, but makes it (or the drive?) bootable.

I want to create a bootable Linux ISO on a USB drive under Debian 9 and found that the ISO is bootable only if it's written to the "general" path /dev/sdX. If the ISO is written to a specific partition, e.g. /dev/sdd1, then it's not bootable. What is the technical reason behind this?

It even works when first writing the ISO to a partition and deleting the partition afterwards using Gnome-Disk, this does not delete the file, but makes it (or the drive?) bootable.

I would like to create a bootable Linux ISO on a USB drive under Debian 9. I found that the ISO is, only, bootable if it has been written to the "general" path /dev/sdX. If the ISO has been written to a specific partition, e.g. /dev/sdd1, then it is not going to be bootable. What is the technical reason behind that?

It works after writing the ISO to a partition and deleting the partition afterwards using Gnome-Disk, this does not delete the file, but makes it (or the drive?) bootable.

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