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So, this has been annoying me for years. Bear with me here.

This happens with more programs than just dd, but I find it happens very often with programs that involve raw filesystem manipulation.

When I'm copying with dd -- e.g., making a bootable USB disk by doing sudo dd if=somelinuxdistro.iso of=/dev/sdb bs=64K status=progress, it's like all my signals are ignored by the application. (Or by the kernel in the case of SIGKILL) htop shows status D, which apparently means "uninterruptible sleep". It can stay in this state for ages if there's a hardware glitch, and in regular usage I can't seem to find any way of detaching it from the terminal so I can keep working -- often I just end up switching to a different terminal to finish my work.

I've looked this up before, but I've never found an explanation of what this state is for or why the kernel refuses to kill a process in this state -- or what exactly the recommended thing is to do to avoid wasting time. (Nor any recommendations of what to do when this happens.)

In short: I'd like to have is a way of reliably force killing processes in state D, or at least detaching them from the terminal. And I'd also like an explanation of what's going on in the background to cause them to be in this state in the first place.

Thanks!

So, this has been annoying me for years. Bear with me here.

This happens with more programs than just dd, but I find it happens very often with programs that involve raw filesystem manipulation.

When I'm copying with dd -- e.g., making a bootable USB disk by doing sudo dd if=somelinuxdistro.iso of=/dev/sdb bs=64K status=progress, it's like all my signals are ignored by the application. (Or by the kernel in the case of SIGKILL) htop shows status D, which apparently means "uninterruptible sleep". It can stay in this state for ages if there's a hardware glitch, and in regular usage I can't seem to find any way of detaching it from the terminal so I can keep working -- often I just end up switching to a different terminal to finish my work.

I've looked this up before, but I've never found an explanation of what this state is for or why the kernel refuses to kill a process in this state -- or what exactly the recommended thing is to do to avoid wasting time. (Nor any recommendations of what to do when this happens.)

In short: I'd like to have is a way of reliably force killing processes in state D, or at least detaching them from the terminal. And I'd also like an explanation of what's going on in the background to cause them to be in this state in the first place.

Thanks!

So, this has been annoying me for years.

This happens with more programs than just dd, but I find it happens very often with programs that involve raw filesystem manipulation.

When I'm copying with dd -- e.g., making a bootable USB disk by doing sudo dd if=somelinuxdistro.iso of=/dev/sdb bs=64K status=progress, it's like all my signals are ignored by the application. (Or by the kernel in the case of SIGKILL) htop shows status D, which apparently means "uninterruptible sleep". It can stay in this state for ages if there's a hardware glitch, and in regular usage I can't seem to find any way of detaching it from the terminal so I can keep working -- often I just end up switching to a different terminal to finish my work.

I've looked this up before, but I've never found an explanation of what this state is for or why the kernel refuses to kill a process in this state -- or what exactly the recommended thing is to do to avoid wasting time. (Nor any recommendations of what to do when this happens.)

In short: I'd like to have is a way of reliably force killing processes in state D, or at least detaching them from the terminal. And I'd also like an explanation of what's going on in the background to cause them to be in this state in the first place.

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dd hanging & uninterruptible sleep (kernel quirk?)

So, this has been annoying me for years. Bear with me here.

This happens with more programs than just dd, but I find it happens very often with programs that involve raw filesystem manipulation.

When I'm copying with dd -- e.g., making a bootable USB disk by doing sudo dd if=somelinuxdistro.iso of=/dev/sdb bs=64K status=progress, it's like all my signals are ignored by the application. (Or by the kernel in the case of SIGKILL) htop shows status D, which apparently means "uninterruptible sleep". It can stay in this state for ages if there's a hardware glitch, and in regular usage I can't seem to find any way of detaching it from the terminal so I can keep working -- often I just end up switching to a different terminal to finish my work.

I've looked this up before, but I've never found an explanation of what this state is for or why the kernel refuses to kill a process in this state -- or what exactly the recommended thing is to do to avoid wasting time. (Nor any recommendations of what to do when this happens.)

In short: I'd like to have is a way of reliably force killing processes in state D, or at least detaching them from the terminal. And I'd also like an explanation of what's going on in the background to cause them to be in this state in the first place.

Thanks!