2 added 1176 characters in body
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Depending on the shell you're using, you can use Parameter Expansion. For instance in bash:

   ${parameter%word}
   ${parameter%%word}
          Remove matching suffix pattern.  The word is expanded to produce
          a pattern just as in pathname expansion.  If the pattern matches
          a trailing portion of the expanded value of parameter, then  the
          result  of the expansion is the expanded value of parameter with
          the shortest matching pattern (the ``%'' case)  or  the  longest
          matching  pattern  (the ``%%'' case) deleted.  If parameter is @
          or *, the pattern removal operation is  applied  to  each  posi‐
          tional  parameter  in  turn,  and the expansion is the resultant
          list.  If parameter is an array variable subscripted with  @  or
          *,  the  pattern  removal operation is applied to each member of
          the array in turn, and the expansion is the resultant list.

In your case that would mean doing something like this:

var4=ztemp.xml
var4=${var4%.*}

Note that the character # behaves in a similar way on the prefix part of the string.

var4=ztemp.xml
var4=${var4%.*}

Depending on the shell you're using, you can use Parameter Expansion. For instance in bash:

   ${parameter%word}
   ${parameter%%word}
          Remove matching suffix pattern.  The word is expanded to produce
          a pattern just as in pathname expansion.  If the pattern matches
          a trailing portion of the expanded value of parameter, then  the
          result  of the expansion is the expanded value of parameter with
          the shortest matching pattern (the ``%'' case)  or  the  longest
          matching  pattern  (the ``%%'' case) deleted.  If parameter is @
          or *, the pattern removal operation is  applied  to  each  posi‐
          tional  parameter  in  turn,  and the expansion is the resultant
          list.  If parameter is an array variable subscripted with  @  or
          *,  the  pattern  removal operation is applied to each member of
          the array in turn, and the expansion is the resultant list.

In your case that would mean doing something like this:

var4=ztemp.xml
var4=${var4%.*}

Note that the character # behaves in a similar way on the prefix part of the string.

1
source | link

var4=ztemp.xml
var4=${var4%.*}