3 some spelling and punctuation fixes
source | link

I noted in Linux Mint and newest Ubuntu 18, that suspend functionality is setup (sudo/root is not needed for suspend setting) and working on level of login/user.

For example, I had 3 users logged on, in Ubuntu, thanthen laptop went to suspend (on lid close) when I had one user session on screen, thanthen resume. Now when I switched to other user session (using ctrl-alt-f), I saw user screen, then automatically in several seconds laptop went to suspend. IMHO not reasonable behaviorbehaviour.

Is there a reason for suspend to be implemented that way? Is it same for other Linux desktop distros? How complex could it be to change kernel to have suspend working for workstation, not user? I'm ready to help make it happen if my help would be of use.

I noted in Linux Mint and newest Ubuntu 18 that suspend functionality is setup (sudo/root is not needed for suspend setting) and working on level of login/user.

For example, I had 3 users logged on in Ubuntu, than laptop went to suspend (on lid close) when I had one user session on screen, than resume. Now when I switched to other user session (using ctrl-alt-f), I saw user screen, then automatically in several seconds laptop went to suspend. IMHO not reasonable behavior.

Is there a reason for suspend to be implemented that way? Is it same for other Linux desktop distros? How complex could it be to change kernel to have suspend working for workstation, not user? I'm ready to help make it happen if my help would be of use.

I noted in Linux Mint and newest Ubuntu 18, that suspend functionality is setup (sudo/root is not needed for suspend setting) and working on level of login/user.

For example, I had 3 users logged on, in Ubuntu, then laptop went to suspend (on lid close) when I had one user session on screen, then resume. Now when I switched to other user session (using ctrl-alt-f), I saw user screen, then automatically in several seconds laptop went to suspend. IMHO not reasonable behaviour.

Is there a reason for suspend to be implemented that way? Is it same for other Linux desktop distros? How complex could it be to change kernel to have suspend working for workstation, not user? I'm ready to help make it happen if my help would be of use.

2 added 26 characters in body
source | link

I noted in Linux Mint and newest Ubuntu 18 that suspend functionality is setup (sudo/root is not needed for suspend setting) and working on level of login/user.

For example, I had 3 users logged on in Ubuntu, than laptop went to suspend (on lid close) when I had one user session on screen, than resume. Now when I switched to other user session (using ctrl-alt-f), I saw user screen, then automatically in several seconds laptop went to suspend. IMHO not reasonable behavior. 

Is there a reason for suspend to be implemented that way? Is it same on Fedorafor other Linux desktop distros? How complex could it be to change kernel to have suspend working for workstation, not user? I'm ready to help make it happen if my help would be of use.

I noted in Linux Mint and newest Ubuntu 18 that suspend functionality is setup (sudo/root is not needed for suspend setting) and working on level of login/user.

For example, I had 3 users logged on in Ubuntu, than laptop went to suspend (on lid close) when I had one user session on screen, than resume. Now when I switched to other user session (using ctrl-alt-f), I saw user screen, then automatically in several seconds laptop went to suspend. IMHO not reasonable behavior. Is there a reason for suspend to be implemented that way? Is it same on Fedora? How complex could it be to change kernel to have suspend working for workstation, not user? I'm ready to help make it happen if my help would be of use.

I noted in Linux Mint and newest Ubuntu 18 that suspend functionality is setup (sudo/root is not needed for suspend setting) and working on level of login/user.

For example, I had 3 users logged on in Ubuntu, than laptop went to suspend (on lid close) when I had one user session on screen, than resume. Now when I switched to other user session (using ctrl-alt-f), I saw user screen, then automatically in several seconds laptop went to suspend. IMHO not reasonable behavior. 

Is there a reason for suspend to be implemented that way? Is it same for other Linux desktop distros? How complex could it be to change kernel to have suspend working for workstation, not user? I'm ready to help make it happen if my help would be of use.

1
source | link

Suspend on level of login, not workstation - possible issue in multiuser system (Ubuntu, Mint)

I noted in Linux Mint and newest Ubuntu 18 that suspend functionality is setup (sudo/root is not needed for suspend setting) and working on level of login/user.

For example, I had 3 users logged on in Ubuntu, than laptop went to suspend (on lid close) when I had one user session on screen, than resume. Now when I switched to other user session (using ctrl-alt-f), I saw user screen, then automatically in several seconds laptop went to suspend. IMHO not reasonable behavior. Is there a reason for suspend to be implemented that way? Is it same on Fedora? How complex could it be to change kernel to have suspend working for workstation, not user? I'm ready to help make it happen if my help would be of use.