3 deleted 8 characters in body
source | link

There are two methods

Method 1

Method 1

The DNS server to use can be changed by updating head file in under resolv.conf.d

$ echo 'nameserver 1.1.1.1' | sudo tee /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/base

$ echo 'nameserver 1.1.1.1' | sudo tee /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/base

and then run

$ sudo resolvconf -u

$ sudo resolvconf -u

The above will generate a generic resolv.conf file in the /etc directory. All your resolve requests will be sent to the above said nameserver. Solved.

However there are implications to this. When using resolvconfresolvconf to directly query 1.1.1.1 for address resolutions, the power of caching provided by dnsmasq is gone. Every request will go to 1.1.1.1

Method 2

Method 2

If you don't want above to happen and use dnsmasq for DNS resolutions refer this answer. The answer is simply described here.

Add the following content in /etc/dnsmasq.conf file.

server=1.1.1.1

Then restart the dnsmasq service

$ sudo systemctl restart dnsmasq.service

$ sudo systemctl restart dnsmasq.service

Things will work fine. Solved.

There are two methods

Method 1

The DNS server to use can be changed by updating head file in under resolv.conf.d

$ echo 'nameserver 1.1.1.1' | sudo tee /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/base

and then run

$ sudo resolvconf -u

The above will generate a generic resolv.conf file in the /etc directory. All your resolve requests will be sent to the above said nameserver. Solved.

However there are implications to this. When using resolvconf to directly query 1.1.1.1 for address resolutions, the power of caching provided by dnsmasq is gone. Every request will go to 1.1.1.1

Method 2

If you don't want above to happen and use dnsmasq for DNS resolutions refer this answer. The answer is simply described here.

Add the following content in /etc/dnsmasq.conf file.

server=1.1.1.1

Then restart the dnsmasq service

$ sudo systemctl restart dnsmasq.service

Things will work fine. Solved.

There are two methods

Method 1

The DNS server to use can be changed by updating head file in under resolv.conf.d

$ echo 'nameserver 1.1.1.1' | sudo tee /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/base

and then run

$ sudo resolvconf -u

The above will generate a generic resolv.conf file in the /etc directory. All your resolve requests will be sent to the above said nameserver. Solved.

However there are implications to this. When using resolvconf to directly query 1.1.1.1 for address resolutions, the power of caching provided by dnsmasq is gone. Every request will go to 1.1.1.1

Method 2

If you don't want above to happen and use dnsmasq for DNS resolutions refer this answer. The answer is simply described here.

Add the following content in /etc/dnsmasq.conf file.

server=1.1.1.1

Then restart the dnsmasq service

$ sudo systemctl restart dnsmasq.service

Things will work fine. Solved.

2 added 3 characters in body
source | link

There are two waysmethods

Method 1

The DNS server to use can be changed by updating head file in under resolv.conf.d

$ echo 'nameserver 1.1.1.1' | sudo tee /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/base

and then run

$ sudo resolvconf -u

The above will generate a generic resolv.conf file in the /etc directory. All your resolve requests will be sent to the above said nameserver. Solved.

However there are implications to this. When using resolvconf to directly query 1.1.1.1 for address resolutions, the power of caching provided by dnsmasq is gone. Every request will go to 1.1.1.1

Method 2

If you don't want above to happen and use dnsmasq for DNS resolutions refer this answer. The answer is simply described here.

Add the following content in /etc/dnsmasq.conf file.

server=1.1.1.1

Then restart the dnsmasq service

$ sudo systemctl restart dnsmasq.service

Things will work fine. Solved.

There are two ways

Method 1

The DNS server to use can be changed by updating head file in under resolv.conf.d

$ echo 'nameserver 1.1.1.1' | sudo tee /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/base

and then run

$ sudo resolvconf -u

The above will generate a generic resolv.conf file in the /etc directory. All your resolve requests will be sent to the above said nameserver. Solved.

However there are implications to this. When using resolvconf to directly query 1.1.1.1 for address resolutions, the power of caching provided by dnsmasq is gone. Every request will go to 1.1.1.1

Method 2

If you don't want above to happen and use dnsmasq for DNS resolutions refer this answer. The answer is simply described here.

Add the following content in /etc/dnsmasq.conf file.

server=1.1.1.1

Then restart the dnsmasq service

$ sudo systemctl restart dnsmasq.service

Things will work fine. Solved.

There are two methods

Method 1

The DNS server to use can be changed by updating head file in under resolv.conf.d

$ echo 'nameserver 1.1.1.1' | sudo tee /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/base

and then run

$ sudo resolvconf -u

The above will generate a generic resolv.conf file in the /etc directory. All your resolve requests will be sent to the above said nameserver. Solved.

However there are implications to this. When using resolvconf to directly query 1.1.1.1 for address resolutions, the power of caching provided by dnsmasq is gone. Every request will go to 1.1.1.1

Method 2

If you don't want above to happen and use dnsmasq for DNS resolutions refer this answer. The answer is simply described here.

Add the following content in /etc/dnsmasq.conf file.

server=1.1.1.1

Then restart the dnsmasq service

$ sudo systemctl restart dnsmasq.service

Things will work fine. Solved.

1
source | link

There are two ways

Method 1

The DNS server to use can be changed by updating head file in under resolv.conf.d

$ echo 'nameserver 1.1.1.1' | sudo tee /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/base

and then run

$ sudo resolvconf -u

The above will generate a generic resolv.conf file in the /etc directory. All your resolve requests will be sent to the above said nameserver. Solved.

However there are implications to this. When using resolvconf to directly query 1.1.1.1 for address resolutions, the power of caching provided by dnsmasq is gone. Every request will go to 1.1.1.1

Method 2

If you don't want above to happen and use dnsmasq for DNS resolutions refer this answer. The answer is simply described here.

Add the following content in /etc/dnsmasq.conf file.

server=1.1.1.1

Then restart the dnsmasq service

$ sudo systemctl restart dnsmasq.service

Things will work fine. Solved.