3 Stray formatting quote at the end
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Files in the same directory that look visually similar, on a filesystem that’s not corrupted, will have different inodes and filenames. In this case, there appears to be trailing whitespace. Inspect the filenames by using ls -Q or ls -b. You can manipulate (rename or delete) the one you want by using find with the -inum predicate to specify the inode number, or use shell globs with interactive prompting; something like:

for f in storage*; do printf 'removing: —>%b<—\n' "$f"; rm -i -- "$f"; done`done

Files in the same directory that look visually similar, on a filesystem that’s not corrupted, will have different inodes and filenames. In this case, there appears to be trailing whitespace. Inspect the filenames by using ls -Q or ls -b. You can manipulate (rename or delete) the one you want by using find with the -inum predicate to specify the inode number, or use shell globs with interactive prompting; something like:

for f in storage*; do printf 'removing: —>%b<—\n' "$f"; rm -i -- "$f"; done`

Files in the same directory that look visually similar, on a filesystem that’s not corrupted, will have different inodes and filenames. In this case, there appears to be trailing whitespace. Inspect the filenames by using ls -Q or ls -b. You can manipulate (rename or delete) the one you want by using find with the -inum predicate to specify the inode number, or use shell globs with interactive prompting; something like:

for f in storage*; do printf 'removing: —>%b<—\n' "$f"; rm -i -- "$f"; done
2 you can have files with the same name in different directories; print the file name with backslash escapes for unprintable characters; fixed smart quotes
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Files in the same directory that look visually similar, on a filesystem that’s not corrupted, will have different inodes and filenames. In this case, there appears to be trailing whitespace. Inspect the filenames by using ls -Q or ls -b. You can manipulate (rename or delete) the one you want by using find with the -inum predicate to specify the inode number, or use shell globs with interactive prompting; something like: for f in storage*; do echo “removing: —>$f<—“; rm -i “$f”; done.

for f in storage*; do printf 'removing: —>%b<—\n' "$f"; rm -i -- "$f"; done`

Files that look visually similar, on a filesystem that’s not corrupted, will have different inodes and filenames. In this case, there appears to be trailing whitespace. Inspect the filenames by using ls -Q or ls -b. You can manipulate (rename or delete) the one you want by using find with the -inum predicate to specify the inode number, or use shell globs with interactive prompting; something like: for f in storage*; do echo “removing: —>$f<—“; rm -i “$f”; done.

Files in the same directory that look visually similar, on a filesystem that’s not corrupted, will have different inodes and filenames. In this case, there appears to be trailing whitespace. Inspect the filenames by using ls -Q or ls -b. You can manipulate (rename or delete) the one you want by using find with the -inum predicate to specify the inode number, or use shell globs with interactive prompting; something like:

for f in storage*; do printf 'removing: —>%b<—\n' "$f"; rm -i -- "$f"; done`
1
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Files that look visually similar, on a filesystem that’s not corrupted, will have different inodes and filenames. In this case, there appears to be trailing whitespace. Inspect the filenames by using ls -Q or ls -b. You can manipulate (rename or delete) the one you want by using find with the -inum predicate to specify the inode number, or use shell globs with interactive prompting; something like: for f in storage*; do echo “removing: —>$f<—“; rm -i “$f”; done.