2 improved formatting with newer configuration options
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anAn easier way that eliminates some of the guesswork on how to make profiles for netctlnetctl (taken from the netctl page on the arch wikinetctl page on the arch wiki):

Step 1. setupSetup wireless internet manually, using wpa_supplicant as described in the OP. If your system doesn't have it installed do $ pacman -S wpa_supplicant.

Step 2. You'll also need dialog package, so $ pacman -S dialog. Then, you could either reboot your system or otherwise disconnect from your wireless network.

Step 3. Run $ wifi-menu -o, then go through the very straightforward Windows/Mac-esque settings. You will givecan check the preset value of your profile a name, which defaults to interface_ssid where interface in OP's case issystem's network id via wlan0$ sudo netctl list and ssid is the name you have given to the router, e.g. The value would be in the format of netgear123wlan098-SSID or something. (apologies if my language is imprecisewhere SSID = your WLAN's name).

Step 4. Finally run $ netctl enable wlan0_netgear123wlan098-SSID, or whatever name you chose.

Step 5. reboot, and you should automatically be able toreboot the system ping$ www.google.comreboot

Still, and do other internet stuff. Occasionallyoccasionally you might get an error message with something like temporarily unable to resolve nametemporarily unable to resolve name or something, but just try pinging again and it should work.

an easier way that eliminates some of the guesswork on how to make profiles for netctl (taken from the netctl page on the arch wiki):

Step 1. setup wireless internet manually, using wpa_supplicant as described in the OP.

Step 2. pacman -S dialog. Then, reboot or otherwise disconnect from wireless.

Step 3. wifi-menu -o, then go through the very straightforward Windows/Mac-esque settings. You will give your profile a name, which defaults to interface_ssid where interface in OP's case is wlan0 and ssid is the name you have given to the router, e.g. netgear123 or something. (apologies if my language is imprecise).

Step 4. netctl enable wlan0_netgear123, or whatever name you chose.

Step 5. reboot, and you should automatically be able to ping www.google.com, and do other internet stuff. Occasionally you might get an error message with something like temporarily unable to resolve name or something, but just try pinging again and it should work.

An easier way that eliminates some of the guesswork on how to make profiles for netctl (taken from the netctl page on the arch wiki):

Step 1. Setup wireless internet manually, using wpa_supplicant as described in the OP. If your system doesn't have it installed do $ pacman -S wpa_supplicant.

Step 2. You'll also need dialog package, so $ pacman -S dialog. Then, you could either reboot your system or disconnect from your wireless network.

Step 3. Run $ wifi-menu -o, then go through the very straightforward Windows/Mac-esque settings. You can check the preset value of your system's network id via $ sudo netctl list. The value would be in the format of wlan098-SSID. (where SSID = your WLAN's name)

Step 4. Finally run $ netctl enable wlan098-SSID and reboot the system $ reboot

Still, occasionally you might get an error message with something like temporarily unable to resolve name or something, but just try pinging again and it should work.

1
source | link

an easier way that eliminates some of the guesswork on how to make profiles for netctl (taken from the netctl page on the arch wiki):

Step 1. setup wireless internet manually, using wpa_supplicant as described in the OP.

Step 2. pacman -S dialog. Then, reboot or otherwise disconnect from wireless.

Step 3. wifi-menu -o, then go through the very straightforward Windows/Mac-esque settings. You will give your profile a name, which defaults to interface_ssid where interface in OP's case is wlan0 and ssid is the name you have given to the router, e.g. netgear123 or something. (apologies if my language is imprecise).

Step 4. netctl enable wlan0_netgear123, or whatever name you chose.

Step 5. reboot, and you should automatically be able to ping www.google.com, and do other internet stuff. Occasionally you might get an error message with something like temporarily unable to resolve name or something, but just try pinging again and it should work.