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The .bash_logout file does not have to exist.

Its contents is sourced by bash when a bash login shell exits. The file makes it possible to do, for example, various forms of cleanup when logging out from a terminal session.

It may be used to execute any shell code, but may be used to e.g. clear the screen if logins are done in a non-GUI environment. Some may also find it useful for explicitly terminating programs that were started from .bash_login or .bash_profile (if, for example, fetchmail or some similar process is started as a user daemon or in the background, it may be good to terminate it in .bash_logout).

The csh shell has a similar file called .logout and the corresponding file for the zsh shell is called .zlogout. The ksh shell has to my knowledge no similar functionality.

See also the tangentally related question Difference between Login Shell and Non-Login Shell?

The .bash_logout file does not have to exist.

Its contents is sourced by bash when a bash login shell exits. The file makes it possible to do, for example, various forms of cleanup when logging out from a terminal session.

It may be used to execute any shell code, but may be used to e.g. clear the screen if logins are done in a non-GUI environment. Some may also find it useful for explicitly terminating programs that were started from .bash_login or .bash_profile (if, for example fetchmail or some similar process is started as a user daemon or in the background, it may be good to terminate it in .bash_logout).

The csh shell has a similar file called .logout and the corresponding file for the zsh shell is called .zlogout. The ksh shell has to my knowledge no similar functionality.

See also the tangentally related question Difference between Login Shell and Non-Login Shell?

The .bash_logout file does not have to exist.

Its contents is sourced by bash when a bash login shell exits. The file makes it possible to do, for example, various forms of cleanup when logging out from a terminal session.

It may be used to execute any shell code, but may be used to e.g. clear the screen if logins are done in a non-GUI environment. Some may also find it useful for explicitly terminating programs that were started from .bash_login or .bash_profile (if, for example, fetchmail or some similar process is started as a user daemon or in the background, it may be good to terminate it in .bash_logout).

The csh shell has a similar file called .logout and the corresponding file for the zsh shell is called .zlogout. The ksh shell has to my knowledge no similar functionality.

See also the tangentally related question Difference between Login Shell and Non-Login Shell?

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The .bash_logout file does not have to exist.

Its contents is sourced by bash when a bash login shell exits. The file makes it possible to do, for example, various forms of cleanup when logging out from a terminal session.

It may be used to execute any shell code, but may also be used to e.g. clear the screen if logins are done in a non-GUI environment. Some may also find it useful for explicitly terminating programs that were started from .bash_login or .bash_profile (if, for example fetchmail or some similar process is started as a user daemon or in the background, it may be good to terminate it in .bash_logout).

The csh shell has a similar file called .logout and the corresponding file for the zsh shell is called .zlogout. The ksh shell has to my knowledge no similar functionality.

See also the tangentally related question Difference between Login Shell and Non-Login Shell?

The .bash_logout file does not have to exist.

Its contents is sourced by bash when a bash login shell exits. The file makes it possible to do, for example, various forms of cleanup when logging out from a terminal session.

It may be used to execute any shell code, but may also be used to e.g. clear the screen if logins are done in a non-GUI environment. Some may also find it useful for explicitly terminating programs that were started from .bash_login or .bash_profile.

The csh shell has a similar file called .logout and the corresponding file for the zsh shell is called .zlogout. The ksh shell has to my knowledge no similar functionality.

See also the tangentally related question Difference between Login Shell and Non-Login Shell?

The .bash_logout file does not have to exist.

Its contents is sourced by bash when a bash login shell exits. The file makes it possible to do, for example, various forms of cleanup when logging out from a terminal session.

It may be used to execute any shell code, but may be used to e.g. clear the screen if logins are done in a non-GUI environment. Some may also find it useful for explicitly terminating programs that were started from .bash_login or .bash_profile (if, for example fetchmail or some similar process is started as a user daemon or in the background, it may be good to terminate it in .bash_logout).

The csh shell has a similar file called .logout and the corresponding file for the zsh shell is called .zlogout. The ksh shell has to my knowledge no similar functionality.

See also the tangentally related question Difference between Login Shell and Non-Login Shell?

2 added 131 characters in body
source | link

The .bash_logout file does not have to exist.

Its contents is sourced by bash when a bash login shell exits. The file makes it possible to do, for example, various forms of cleanup when logging out from a terminal session.

It may be used to execute any shell code, but may also be used to e.g. clear the screen if logins are done in a non-GUI environment. Some may also find it useful for explicitly terminating programs that were started from .bash_login or .bash_profile.

The csh shell has a similar file called .logout and the corresponding file for the zsh shell is called .zlogout. The ksh shell has to my knowledge no similar functionality.

See also the tangentally related question Difference between Login Shell and Non-Login Shell?

The .bash_logout file does not have to exist.

Its contents is sourced by bash when a bash login shell exits. The file makes it possible to do, for example, various forms of cleanup when logging out from a terminal session.

It may be used to execute any shell code, but may also be used to e.g. clear the screen if logins are done in a non-GUI environment. Some may also find it useful for explicitly terminating programs that were started from .bash_login or .bash_profile.

The csh shell has a similar file called .logout and the corresponding file for the zsh shell is called .zlogout. The ksh shell has to my knowledge no similar functionality.

The .bash_logout file does not have to exist.

Its contents is sourced by bash when a bash login shell exits. The file makes it possible to do, for example, various forms of cleanup when logging out from a terminal session.

It may be used to execute any shell code, but may also be used to e.g. clear the screen if logins are done in a non-GUI environment. Some may also find it useful for explicitly terminating programs that were started from .bash_login or .bash_profile.

The csh shell has a similar file called .logout and the corresponding file for the zsh shell is called .zlogout. The ksh shell has to my knowledge no similar functionality.

See also the tangentally related question Difference between Login Shell and Non-Login Shell?

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