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Usually the man pages get installed as part of the package.

Perhaps the best idea is starting your search at the web page of your distribution and looking for specific documenation there. I currently use Ubuntu and a quick search yielded the Ubuntu Manpage Repository. I am sure similar pages exist for all the major distributions.

However, anytime I've quickly looked for a man page, I've just googled 'man page some_command' and found several copies of the Unix/Linux man pages on line. I do this frequently when posting here or on SO and want to provide a reference for some command I'm mentioning in a post.

UNIX ON-LINE Man Pages is a repository of man pages.

And here is another index of On-line UNIX manual pages.

Finally,

  sudo apt-get install manpages-dev

will install the man pages for system and library calls.

Update: As @jasonwryan points out in a helpful comment, the GNU Manuals are available online too.

Update 2: Another useful comment by @user606723 reminds us that there can be different versions of commands/man pages, so while looking at the documentation it would be prudent to note specifics. Also, perhaps while googling it may be worth including the distribution in your search.

Another idea based on this comment is starting your search at the web page of your distribution and looking for specific documenation there. I currently use Ubuntu and a quick search yielded the Ubuntu Manpage Repository.

Usually the man pages get installed as part of the package.

However, anytime I've looked for a man page, I've just googled 'man page some_command' and found several copies of the Unix/Linux man pages on line. I do this frequently when posting here or on SO and want to provide a reference for some command I'm mentioning in a post.

UNIX ON-LINE Man Pages is a repository of man pages.

And here is another index of On-line UNIX manual pages.

Finally,

  sudo apt-get install manpages-dev

will install the man pages for system and library calls.

Update: As @jasonwryan points out in a helpful comment, the GNU Manuals are available online too.

Update 2: Another useful comment by @user606723 reminds us that there can be different versions of commands/man pages, so while looking at the documentation it would be prudent to note specifics. Also, perhaps while googling it may be worth including the distribution in your search.

Another idea based on this comment is starting your search at the web page of your distribution and looking for specific documenation there. I currently use Ubuntu and a quick search yielded the Ubuntu Manpage Repository.

Usually the man pages get installed as part of the package.

Perhaps the best idea is starting your search at the web page of your distribution and looking for specific documenation there. I currently use Ubuntu and a quick search yielded the Ubuntu Manpage Repository. I am sure similar pages exist for all the major distributions.

However, anytime I've quickly looked for a man page, I've just googled 'man page some_command' and found several copies of the Unix/Linux man pages on line. I do this frequently when posting here or on SO and want to provide a reference for some command I'm mentioning in a post.

UNIX ON-LINE Man Pages is a repository of man pages.

And here is another index of On-line UNIX manual pages.

Finally,

  sudo apt-get install manpages-dev

will install the man pages for system and library calls.

Update: As @jasonwryan points out in a helpful comment, the GNU Manuals are available online too.

Update 2: Another useful comment by @user606723 reminds us that there can be different versions of commands/man pages, so while looking at the documentation it would be prudent to note specifics.

6 deleted 42 characters in body
source | link

Usually the man pages get installed as part of the package.

However, anytime I've looked for a man page, I've just googled 'man page some_command' and found several copies of the Unix/Linux man pages on line. I do this frequently when posting here or on SO and want to provide a reference for some command I'm mentioning in a post.

UNIX ON-LINE Man Pages is a repository of man pages.

And here is another index of On-line UNIX manual pages.

Finally,

  sudo apt-get install manpages-dev

will install the man pages for system and library calls.

Update: As @jasonwryan points out in a helpful comment, the GNU Manuals are available online too.

Update 2: Another useful comment by @user606723 reminds us that there can be different versions of commands/man pages, so while looking at the documentation it would be prudent to note specifics. Also, perhaps while googling it may be worth including the distribution in your search.

Another idea that just occured to me based on this comment is that you may want to start tostarting your search at the web page of your distribution and looklooking for specific documenation there. I currently use Ubuntu and a quick search yielded the Ubuntu Manpage Repository.

Usually the man pages get installed as part of the package.

However, anytime I've looked for a man page, I've just googled 'man page some_command' and found several copies of the Unix/Linux man pages on line. I do this frequently when posting here or on SO and want to provide a reference for some command I'm mentioning in a post.

UNIX ON-LINE Man Pages is a repository of man pages.

And here is another index of On-line UNIX manual pages.

Finally,

  sudo apt-get install manpages-dev

will install the man pages for system and library calls.

Update: As @jasonwryan points out in a helpful comment, the GNU Manuals are available online too.

Update 2: Another useful comment by @user606723 reminds us that there can be different versions of commands/man pages, so while looking at the documentation it would be prudent to note specifics. Also, perhaps while googling it may be worth including the distribution in your search.

Another idea that just occured to me based on this comment is that you may want to start to your search at the web page of your distribution and look for specific documenation there. I currently use Ubuntu and a quick search yielded the Ubuntu Manpage Repository.

Usually the man pages get installed as part of the package.

However, anytime I've looked for a man page, I've just googled 'man page some_command' and found several copies of the Unix/Linux man pages on line. I do this frequently when posting here or on SO and want to provide a reference for some command I'm mentioning in a post.

UNIX ON-LINE Man Pages is a repository of man pages.

And here is another index of On-line UNIX manual pages.

Finally,

  sudo apt-get install manpages-dev

will install the man pages for system and library calls.

Update: As @jasonwryan points out in a helpful comment, the GNU Manuals are available online too.

Update 2: Another useful comment by @user606723 reminds us that there can be different versions of commands/man pages, so while looking at the documentation it would be prudent to note specifics. Also, perhaps while googling it may be worth including the distribution in your search.

Another idea based on this comment is starting your search at the web page of your distribution and looking for specific documenation there. I currently use Ubuntu and a quick search yielded the Ubuntu Manpage Repository.

5 added 588 characters in body
source | link

Usually the man pages get installed as part of the package.

However, anytime I've looked for a man page, I've just googled 'man page some_command' and found several copies of the Unix/Linux man pages on line. I do this frequently when posting here or on SO and want to provide a reference for some command I'm mentioning in a post.

UNIX ON-LINE Man Pages is a repository of man pages.

And here is another index of On-line UNIX manual pages.

Finally,

  sudo apt-get install manpages-dev

will install the man pages for system and library calls.

Update: As @jasonwryan points out in a helpful comment, the GNU Manuals are available online too.

Update 2: Another useful comment by @user606723 reminds us that there can be different versions of commands/man pages, so while looking at the documentation it would be prudent to note specifics. Also, perhaps while googling it may be worth including the distribution in your search.

Another idea that just occured to me based on this comment is that you may want to start to your search at the web page of your distribution and look for specific documenation there. I currently use Ubuntu and a quick search yielded the Ubuntu Manpage Repository.

Usually the man pages get installed as part of the package.

However, anytime I've looked for a man page, I've just googled 'man page some_command' and found several copies of the Unix/Linux man pages on line. I do this frequently when posting here or on SO and want to provide a reference for some command I'm mentioning in a post.

UNIX ON-LINE Man Pages is a repository of man pages.

And here is another index of On-line UNIX manual pages.

Finally,

  sudo apt-get install manpages-dev

will install the man pages for system and library calls.

Update: As @jasonwryan points out in a helpful comment, the GNU Manuals are available online too.

Usually the man pages get installed as part of the package.

However, anytime I've looked for a man page, I've just googled 'man page some_command' and found several copies of the Unix/Linux man pages on line. I do this frequently when posting here or on SO and want to provide a reference for some command I'm mentioning in a post.

UNIX ON-LINE Man Pages is a repository of man pages.

And here is another index of On-line UNIX manual pages.

Finally,

  sudo apt-get install manpages-dev

will install the man pages for system and library calls.

Update: As @jasonwryan points out in a helpful comment, the GNU Manuals are available online too.

Update 2: Another useful comment by @user606723 reminds us that there can be different versions of commands/man pages, so while looking at the documentation it would be prudent to note specifics. Also, perhaps while googling it may be worth including the distribution in your search.

Another idea that just occured to me based on this comment is that you may want to start to your search at the web page of your distribution and look for specific documenation there. I currently use Ubuntu and a quick search yielded the Ubuntu Manpage Repository.

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