3 replaced http://unix.stackexchange.com/ with https://unix.stackexchange.com/
source | link

As @psusipsusi hintedhinted metadata format is the kye, as it seems — now "1.2" is the default, not "0.9". It's pity to say, but this could lead to data loss, since 1.2 uses 4 KiB offset:

1, 1.0, 1.1, 1.2 default Use the new version-1 format superblock. This has fewer restrictions. It can easily be moved between hosts with different endian-ness, and a recovery operation can be checkpointed and restarted. The different sub-versions store the superblock at different locations on the device, either at the end (for 1.0), at the start (for 1.1) or 4K from the start (for 1.2).

An advice (alas, late one): never rush into re-creating an array w/o giving it a try with -B — build:

   -B, --build
          Build a legacy array without superblocks

UPD.: turned out -B refuses to build RAID-5… :-/

As @psusi hinted metadata format is the kye, as it seems — now "1.2" is the default, not "0.9". It's pity to say, but this could lead to data loss, since 1.2 uses 4 KiB offset:

1, 1.0, 1.1, 1.2 default Use the new version-1 format superblock. This has fewer restrictions. It can easily be moved between hosts with different endian-ness, and a recovery operation can be checkpointed and restarted. The different sub-versions store the superblock at different locations on the device, either at the end (for 1.0), at the start (for 1.1) or 4K from the start (for 1.2).

An advice (alas, late one): never rush into re-creating an array w/o giving it a try with -B — build:

   -B, --build
          Build a legacy array without superblocks

UPD.: turned out -B refuses to build RAID-5… :-/

As @psusi hinted metadata format is the kye, as it seems — now "1.2" is the default, not "0.9". It's pity to say, but this could lead to data loss, since 1.2 uses 4 KiB offset:

1, 1.0, 1.1, 1.2 default Use the new version-1 format superblock. This has fewer restrictions. It can easily be moved between hosts with different endian-ness, and a recovery operation can be checkpointed and restarted. The different sub-versions store the superblock at different locations on the device, either at the end (for 1.0), at the start (for 1.1) or 4K from the start (for 1.2).

An advice (alas, late one): never rush into re-creating an array w/o giving it a try with -B — build:

   -B, --build
          Build a legacy array without superblocks

UPD.: turned out -B refuses to build RAID-5… :-/

2 no build RAID-5
source | link

As @psusi hinted metadata format is the kye, as it seems — now "1.2" is the default, not "0.9". It's pity to say, but this could lead to data loss, since 1.2 uses 4 KiB offset:

1, 1.0, 1.1, 1.2 default Use the new version-1 format superblock. This has fewer restrictions. It can easily be moved between hosts with different endian-ness, and a recovery operation can be checkpointed and restarted. The different sub-versions store the superblock at different locations on the device, either at the end (for 1.0), at the start (for 1.1) or 4K from the start (for 1.2).

An advice (alas, late one): never rush into re-creating an array w/o giving it a try with -B — build:

   -B, --build
          Build a legacy array without superblocks

UPD.: turned out -B refuses to build RAID-5… :-/

As @psusi hinted metadata format is the kye, as it seems — now "1.2" is the default, not "0.9". It's pity to say, but this could lead to data loss, since 1.2 uses 4 KiB offset:

1, 1.0, 1.1, 1.2 default Use the new version-1 format superblock. This has fewer restrictions. It can easily be moved between hosts with different endian-ness, and a recovery operation can be checkpointed and restarted. The different sub-versions store the superblock at different locations on the device, either at the end (for 1.0), at the start (for 1.1) or 4K from the start (for 1.2).

An advice (alas, late one): never rush into re-creating an array w/o giving it a try with -B — build:

   -B, --build
          Build a legacy array without superblocks

As @psusi hinted metadata format is the kye, as it seems — now "1.2" is the default, not "0.9". It's pity to say, but this could lead to data loss, since 1.2 uses 4 KiB offset:

1, 1.0, 1.1, 1.2 default Use the new version-1 format superblock. This has fewer restrictions. It can easily be moved between hosts with different endian-ness, and a recovery operation can be checkpointed and restarted. The different sub-versions store the superblock at different locations on the device, either at the end (for 1.0), at the start (for 1.1) or 4K from the start (for 1.2).

An advice (alas, late one): never rush into re-creating an array w/o giving it a try with -B — build:

   -B, --build
          Build a legacy array without superblocks

UPD.: turned out -B refuses to build RAID-5… :-/

1
source | link

As @psusi hinted metadata format is the kye, as it seems — now "1.2" is the default, not "0.9". It's pity to say, but this could lead to data loss, since 1.2 uses 4 KiB offset:

1, 1.0, 1.1, 1.2 default Use the new version-1 format superblock. This has fewer restrictions. It can easily be moved between hosts with different endian-ness, and a recovery operation can be checkpointed and restarted. The different sub-versions store the superblock at different locations on the device, either at the end (for 1.0), at the start (for 1.1) or 4K from the start (for 1.2).

An advice (alas, late one): never rush into re-creating an array w/o giving it a try with -B — build:

   -B, --build
          Build a legacy array without superblocks