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There are two basic methods of dividing a domain's web space. You can divide it into subdomains via the "VirtualHost" directive, or you can place hierarchical locations within the root of the web space.

Or some combination of the two.

The Alias directive assigns a hierarchical location. So, in your example, the correct way to assign the web space root to a filesystem directory is:

Alias "/" "/etc/zabbix/web/"

For further reading: Apache mod_alias

Make sure that your web server's user has read access to the directory you are aliasing. Remember that directories are "executed" which means that all directories within the webspace need to have the execute bit set for the web server's user.

There are two basic methods of dividing a domain's web space. You can divide it into subdomains via the "VirtualHost" directive, or you can place hierarchical locations within the root of the web space.

Or some combination of the two.

The Alias directive assigns a hierarchical location. So, in your example, the correct way to assign the web space root to a filesystem directory is:

Alias "/" "/etc/zabbix/web/"

For further reading: Apache mod_alias

There are two basic methods of dividing a domain's web space. You can divide it into subdomains via the "VirtualHost" directive, or you can place hierarchical locations within the root of the web space.

Or some combination of the two.

The Alias directive assigns a hierarchical location. So, in your example, the correct way to assign the web space root to a filesystem directory is:

Alias "/" "/etc/zabbix/web/"

For further reading: Apache mod_alias

Make sure that your web server's user has read access to the directory you are aliasing. Remember that directories are "executed" which means that all directories within the webspace need to have the execute bit set for the web server's user.

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source | link

There are two basic methods of dividing a domain's web space. You can divide it into subdomains via the "VirtualHost" directive, or you can place hierarchical locations within the root of the web space.

Or some combination of the two.

The Alias directive assigns a hierarchical location. So, in your example, the correct way to assign the web space root to a filesystem directory is:

Alias "/" "/etc/zabbix/web/"

For further reading: Apache mod_alias