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ssh doesn't "point to" anything, unless you specifically set that up in .ssh/config .

Also note that the host command specifically uses DNS to look up names, and will not check your /etc/hosts file.

Something in your machine's configuration is relating a host named "foo" to that IP address. Is it in your /etc/hosts file? Maybe your /etc/nsswitch.conf file is doing something unusual and pulling "foo" from an LDAP or NIS server?

What do you get if you ping foo or nc -v foo 22 ?

ssh doesn't "point to" anything, unless you specifically set that up in .ssh/config .

Also note that the host command specifically uses DNS to look up names, and will not check your /etc/hosts file.

Something in your machine's configuration is relating a host named "foo" to that IP address. Is it in your /etc/hosts file? Maybe your /etc/nsswitch.conf file is doing something unusual and pulling "foo" from an LDAP or NIS server?

ssh doesn't "point to" anything, unless you specifically set that up in .ssh/config .

Also note that the host command specifically uses DNS to look up names, and will not check your /etc/hosts file.

Something in your machine's configuration is relating a host named "foo" to that IP address. Is it in your /etc/hosts file? Maybe your /etc/nsswitch.conf file is doing something unusual and pulling "foo" from an LDAP or NIS server?

What do you get if you ping foo or nc -v foo 22 ?

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source | link

ssh doesn't "point to" anything, unless you specifically set that up in .ssh/config .

Also note that the host command specifically uses DNS to look up names, and will not check your /etc/hosts file.

Something in your machine's configuration is relating a host named "foo" to that IP address. Is it in your /etc/hosts file? Maybe your /etc/nsswitch.conf file is doing something unusual and pulling "foo" from an LDAP or NIS server?