2 Clarify the trade-off between DOSEMU and DOSBox
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Since everyone seems to be assuming you mean "pre-IBM PC" by "older computers", I'm going to go the other route and offer an answer that interprets "older computers" to mean "IBM-compatibles before Windows 9x".

If, you meant computers running versions of MS-DOS that included QBASIC.EXE, you have three options, depending on how strictly you define running them "on Linux":

  1. If you've still got a copy of QBASIC.EXE kicking around, you could use DOSBox or DOSEMU to run it in a virtualized DOS environment. (Both are available in Debian's repositories and are simple to set up. Just set a folder to be mounted as C:, drop QBASIC.EXE into it, and you're good to go.)

    That'll give you perfect compatibility with old source code, but no integration with the host OS beyond "C: is actually a folder, rather than a disk image".

    I should clarify, however, that there's a trade-off between the two. DOSEMU will run in whatever terminal you want, but won't support the fancy low-level tricks some QBasic stuff used (eg. for specialized graphics modes). The only way to support that is a full emulator like DOSBox... but DOSBox will pop up its own window rather than using your terminal.

  2. FreeBASIC has a qb dialect/mode that aims for perfect compatibility with a large subset of QuickBASIC. (The unsupported stuff is mostly low-level stuff related to the fact that QuickBASIC was a 16-bit real-mode system while FreeBASIC is a 32-bit protected mode system.)

    FreeBASIC offers Linux binaries, but you'll only find it in your package repository if you actually meant "Debian-family distros" rather than "Debian" and are running Ubuntu or an Ubuntu derivative like Mint.

  3. The Linux builds of QB64 aren't even in the Ubuntu repositories, but it specifically aims to be the most compatible protected-mode QuickBASIC descendant and even provides an IDE that attempts to clone the QBasic/QuickBasic IDE.

Since everyone seems to be assuming you mean "pre-IBM PC" by "older computers", I'm going to go the other route and offer an answer that interprets "older computers" to mean "IBM-compatibles before Windows 9x".

If, you meant computers running versions of MS-DOS that included QBASIC.EXE, you have three options, depending on how strictly you define running them "on Linux":

  1. If you've still got a copy of QBASIC.EXE kicking around, you could use DOSBox or DOSEMU to run it in a virtualized DOS environment. (Both are available in Debian's repositories and are simple to set up. Just set a folder to be mounted as C:, drop QBASIC.EXE into it, and you're good to go.)

    That'll give you perfect compatibility with old source code, but no integration with the host OS beyond "C: is actually a folder, rather than a disk image".

  2. FreeBASIC has a qb dialect/mode that aims for perfect compatibility with a large subset of QuickBASIC. (The unsupported stuff is mostly low-level stuff related to the fact that QuickBASIC was a 16-bit real-mode system while FreeBASIC is a 32-bit protected mode system.)

    FreeBASIC offers Linux binaries, but you'll only find it in your package repository if you actually meant "Debian-family distros" rather than "Debian" and are running Ubuntu or an Ubuntu derivative like Mint.

  3. The Linux builds of QB64 aren't even in the Ubuntu repositories, but it specifically aims to be the most compatible protected-mode QuickBASIC descendant and even provides an IDE that attempts to clone the QBasic/QuickBasic IDE.

Since everyone seems to be assuming you mean "pre-IBM PC" by "older computers", I'm going to go the other route and offer an answer that interprets "older computers" to mean "IBM-compatibles before Windows 9x".

If, you meant computers running versions of MS-DOS that included QBASIC.EXE, you have three options, depending on how strictly you define running them "on Linux":

  1. If you've still got a copy of QBASIC.EXE kicking around, you could use DOSBox or DOSEMU to run it in a virtualized DOS environment. (Both are available in Debian's repositories and are simple to set up. Just set a folder to be mounted as C:, drop QBASIC.EXE into it, and you're good to go.)

    That'll give you perfect compatibility with old source code, but no integration with the host OS beyond "C: is actually a folder, rather than a disk image".

    I should clarify, however, that there's a trade-off between the two. DOSEMU will run in whatever terminal you want, but won't support the fancy low-level tricks some QBasic stuff used (eg. for specialized graphics modes). The only way to support that is a full emulator like DOSBox... but DOSBox will pop up its own window rather than using your terminal.

  2. FreeBASIC has a qb dialect/mode that aims for perfect compatibility with a large subset of QuickBASIC. (The unsupported stuff is mostly low-level stuff related to the fact that QuickBASIC was a 16-bit real-mode system while FreeBASIC is a 32-bit protected mode system.)

    FreeBASIC offers Linux binaries, but you'll only find it in your package repository if you actually meant "Debian-family distros" rather than "Debian" and are running Ubuntu or an Ubuntu derivative like Mint.

  3. The Linux builds of QB64 aren't even in the Ubuntu repositories, but it specifically aims to be the most compatible protected-mode QuickBASIC descendant and even provides an IDE that attempts to clone the QBasic/QuickBasic IDE.

1
source | link

Since everyone seems to be assuming you mean "pre-IBM PC" by "older computers", I'm going to go the other route and offer an answer that interprets "older computers" to mean "IBM-compatibles before Windows 9x".

If, you meant computers running versions of MS-DOS that included QBASIC.EXE, you have three options, depending on how strictly you define running them "on Linux":

  1. If you've still got a copy of QBASIC.EXE kicking around, you could use DOSBox or DOSEMU to run it in a virtualized DOS environment. (Both are available in Debian's repositories and are simple to set up. Just set a folder to be mounted as C:, drop QBASIC.EXE into it, and you're good to go.)

    That'll give you perfect compatibility with old source code, but no integration with the host OS beyond "C: is actually a folder, rather than a disk image".

  2. FreeBASIC has a qb dialect/mode that aims for perfect compatibility with a large subset of QuickBASIC. (The unsupported stuff is mostly low-level stuff related to the fact that QuickBASIC was a 16-bit real-mode system while FreeBASIC is a 32-bit protected mode system.)

    FreeBASIC offers Linux binaries, but you'll only find it in your package repository if you actually meant "Debian-family distros" rather than "Debian" and are running Ubuntu or an Ubuntu derivative like Mint.

  3. The Linux builds of QB64 aren't even in the Ubuntu repositories, but it specifically aims to be the most compatible protected-mode QuickBASIC descendant and even provides an IDE that attempts to clone the QBasic/QuickBasic IDE.