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User test need a home folder to store config files (example: /home/test/.bashrc which is bash configuration file)
What you can do is make him the owner of directory in /var/www and he will be the only one able to access it.

chown -R test /var/www/target-dir

You can them make a link from /var/www to its home folder.

ln -s /var/www/target-dir /home/test/

Then if he connect through ftp/sftp/ssh he will be logged into is /home/test directory that contain a link to the folder he can modify.

If you do not want this user test to have totoo much writerights, do not make him a sudoer. Linux is designed to be protected by default for user without root access.

  If you want to protect an other user home folder from being red, you can do as follow

chmod o-x /home/other_user

User test need a home folder to store config files (example: /home/test/.bashrc which is bash configuration file)
What you can do is make him the owner of directory in /var/www and he will be the only one able to access it.

chown -R test /var/www/target-dir

You can them make a link from /var/www to its home folder.

ln -s /var/www/target-dir /home/test/

Then if he connect through ftp/sftp/ssh he will be logged into is /home/test directory that contain a link to the folder he can modify.

If you do not want this user test to have to much write, do not make him a sudoer. Linux is designed to be protected by default for user without root access.

  If you want to protect an other user home folder from being red, you can do as follow

chmod o-x /home/other_user

User test need a home folder to store config files (example: /home/test/.bashrc which is bash configuration file)
What you can do is make him the owner of directory in /var/www and he will be the only one able to access it.

chown -R test /var/www/target-dir

You can them make a link from /var/www to its home folder.

ln -s /var/www/target-dir /home/test/

Then if he connect through ftp/sftp/ssh he will be logged into is /home/test directory that contain a link to the folder he can modify.

If you do not want this user test to have too much rights, do not make him a sudoer. If you want to protect an other user home folder from being red, you can do as follow

chmod o-x /home/other_user
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3 added 125 characters in body
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User test need a home folder to store config files (example: /home/test/.bashrc which is bash configuration file)
What you can do is make him the owner of directory in /var/www and he will be the only one able to access it.

chown -R test /var/www/target-dir

You can them make a link from /var/www to its home folder.

ln -s /var/www/target-dir /home/test/

Then if he connect through ftp/sftp/ssh he will be logged into is /home/test directory that contain a link to the folder he can modify.

If you do not want this user test to have to much write, do not make him a sudoer. Linux is designed to be protected by default for user without root access.

Maybe there is a solution that fit your problem more but this is the closest idea I can come up with and I think it is the way it should beIf you want to fit linux ideology. protect an other user home folder from being red, you can do as follow

chmod o-x /home/other_user

User test need a home folder to store config files (example: /home/test/.bashrc which is bash configuration file)
What you can do is make him the owner of directory in /var/www and he will be the only one able to access it.

chown -R test /var/www/target-dir

You can them make a link from /var/www to its home folder.

ln -s /var/www/target-dir /home/test/

Then if he connect through ftp/sftp/ssh he will be logged into is /home/test directory that contain a link to the folder he can modify.

If you do not want this user test to have to much write, do not make him a sudoer. Linux is designed to be protected by default for user without root access.

Maybe there is a solution that fit your problem more but this is the closest idea I can come up with and I think it is the way it should be to fit linux ideology.

User test need a home folder to store config files (example: /home/test/.bashrc which is bash configuration file)
What you can do is make him the owner of directory in /var/www and he will be the only one able to access it.

chown -R test /var/www/target-dir

You can them make a link from /var/www to its home folder.

ln -s /var/www/target-dir /home/test/

Then if he connect through ftp/sftp/ssh he will be logged into is /home/test directory that contain a link to the folder he can modify.

If you do not want this user test to have to much write, do not make him a sudoer. Linux is designed to be protected by default for user without root access.

If you want to protect an other user home folder from being red, you can do as follow

chmod o-x /home/other_user
2 added 35 characters in body
source | link

User test need a home folder to store config files (exempleexample: /home/test/.bashrc which is bash configuration file)
What you can do is make him the owner of directory in /var/www and he will be the only one able to access it.

chown -R test /var/www/target-dir

You can them make a link from /var/www to its home folder.

ln -s /var/www/target-dir /home/test/

Then if he connect through ftp/sftp/ssh he will be logged into is /home/test directory that contain a link to the folder he can modify.

If you do not want this user test to have to much write, if he isdo not make him a sudoer, he won't be able. Linux is designed to harm your system anywaybe protected by default for user without root access.
Maybe

Maybe there is a solution that fit your problem more but this is the closest idea I can come up with and I think it is the way it should be to fit linux ideology.

User test need a home folder to store config files (exemple: .bashrc)
What you can do is make him the owner of directory in /var/www and he will be the only one able to access it.

chown -R test /var/www/target-dir

You can them make a link from /var/www to its home folder.

ln -s /var/www/target-dir /home/test/

If you do not want this user test to have to much write, if he is not sudoer, he won't be able to harm your system anyway.
Maybe there is a solution that fit your problem more but this is the closest idea I can come up with

User test need a home folder to store config files (example: /home/test/.bashrc which is bash configuration file)
What you can do is make him the owner of directory in /var/www and he will be the only one able to access it.

chown -R test /var/www/target-dir

You can them make a link from /var/www to its home folder.

ln -s /var/www/target-dir /home/test/

Then if he connect through ftp/sftp/ssh he will be logged into is /home/test directory that contain a link to the folder he can modify.

If you do not want this user test to have to much write, do not make him a sudoer. Linux is designed to be protected by default for user without root access.

Maybe there is a solution that fit your problem more but this is the closest idea I can come up with and I think it is the way it should be to fit linux ideology.

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