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4 Make the question about one thing
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About rw init= Why does Linux allow ‘init=/bin/bashbash’?

I recently found out that if I edit GRUB before booting and I add rw init=/bin/bash I end up with a root shell.

Being in a condition that I want to understand everything I would like to know why this happens. I mean is it a bug? is it a feature? is it there to help admins to fix things as it only works if you have physical access to a computer?

Which part are we exploiting?Is it provided by GRUB or the actual kernel?

About rw init=/bin/bash

I recently found out that if I edit GRUB before booting and I add rw init=/bin/bash I end up with a root shell.

Being in a condition that I want to understand everything I would like to know why this happens. I mean is it a bug? is it a feature? is it there to help admins to fix things as it only works if you have physical access to a computer?

Which part are we exploiting? GRUB or the actual kernel?

Why does Linux allow ‘init=/bin/bash’?

I recently found out that if I edit GRUB before booting and I add rw init=/bin/bash I end up with a root shell.

Being in a condition that I want to understand everything I would like to know why this happens. I mean is it a bug? is it a feature? is it there to help admins to fix things as it only works if you have physical access to a computer?

Is it provided by GRUB or the actual kernel?

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