3 added 175 characters in body
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To properly create the two devices, use:

mknod -m 444 /dev/random c 1 8
mknod -m 444 /dev/urandom c 1 9

/dev/random will generate high-entropy pseudorandom data. If entropy runs out, it will block until enough has been generated for new PRD.

/dev/urandom doesn't care about being sufficiently-high-entropy, so you can use it for noncritical "randomness" likewhich is by current cryptographic understanding not actually meaningful. The upshot is that urandom will not block during an entropy drought, but since sufficient entropy was used for die-rollers and other non-secure functionsthe initial seed, the "weakness" in the randomness is purely theoretical at this point.

To properly create the two devices, use:

mknod -m 444 /dev/random c 1 8
mknod -m 444 /dev/urandom c 1 9

/dev/random will generate high-entropy pseudorandom data. If entropy runs out, it will block until enough has been generated for new PRD.

/dev/urandom doesn't care about being sufficiently-high-entropy, so you can use it for noncritical "randomness" like for die-rollers and other non-secure functions.

To properly create the two devices, use:

mknod -m 444 /dev/random c 1 8
mknod -m 444 /dev/urandom c 1 9

/dev/random will generate high-entropy pseudorandom data. If entropy runs out, it will block until enough has been generated for new PRD.

/dev/urandom doesn't care about being sufficiently-high-entropy, which is by current cryptographic understanding not actually meaningful. The upshot is that urandom will not block during an entropy drought, but since sufficient entropy was used for the initial seed, the "weakness" in the randomness is purely theoretical at this point.

2 deleted 1 character in body
source | link

To properly create the two devices, use:

mknod -m 444 /dev/random c 1 8
mknod -m 444 /dev/urandom c 1 9

/dev/random will generate high-entrorpyentropy pseudorandom data. If entropy runs out, it will block until enough has been generated for new PRD.

/dev/randomurandom doesn't care about being sufficiently-high-entropy, so you can use it for noncritical "randomness" like for die-rollers and other non-secure functions.,

To properly create the two devices, use:

mknod -m 444 /dev/random c 1 8
mknod -m 444 /dev/urandom c 1 9

/dev/random will generate high-entrorpy pseudorandom data. If entropy runs out, it will block until enough has been generated for new PRD.

/dev/random doesn't care about being sufficiently-high-entropy, so you can use it for noncritical "randomness" like for die-rollers and other non-secure functions.,

To properly create the two devices, use:

mknod -m 444 /dev/random c 1 8
mknod -m 444 /dev/urandom c 1 9

/dev/random will generate high-entropy pseudorandom data. If entropy runs out, it will block until enough has been generated for new PRD.

/dev/urandom doesn't care about being sufficiently-high-entropy, so you can use it for noncritical "randomness" like for die-rollers and other non-secure functions.

1
source | link

To properly create the two devices, use:

mknod -m 444 /dev/random c 1 8
mknod -m 444 /dev/urandom c 1 9

/dev/random will generate high-entrorpy pseudorandom data. If entropy runs out, it will block until enough has been generated for new PRD.

/dev/random doesn't care about being sufficiently-high-entropy, so you can use it for noncritical "randomness" like for die-rollers and other non-secure functions.,