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I'd like to copy a partition to another laptop (to back it up). I'll connect the side-by-side laptops with an ethernet cable. To do the backup, I'd specifically like to use the "dd" command.

For simplicity, I haven't shown below the "netcat" commands (which provide the laptop-to-laptop communication) that I'll be using along with dd. So below is the effective command that I plan to run to do the backup:

$ dd if=/dev/sda6 of=/home/name/sda6.img

dd if=/dev/sda6 of=/home/name/sda6.img

To restore the backup later, I plan to run

$ dd if=/home/name/sda6.img of=/dev/sda6

dd if=/home/name/sda6.img of=/dev/sda6

BUT I'VE READ that in order to do the latter command (which is a reversal of the first), the destination partition needs to be LARGER than the image file, even though I'm just putting the SAME DATA back where it came from.

This would involve me in increasing the size of the original partition, which might involve extensive work, which I'd rather not do.

SO MY QUESTION IS, for the restore, will I really need to increase the size of the destination partition, or will the data fit neatly back on the partition?

Also, if I WOULD need to increase the partition size with the above scenario, is there some tweak I can do to the dd commands that makes increasing the partition size unnecessary?

Added detail

I realise that the following are alternative ways to do such a backup, but I chose not to use them because of the reasons below:

tartar: Apparently Apparently doesn't backup certain attributes or something like that.

cpcp: Apparrently Apparrently doesn't backup certain things, like ACLs.

rsyncrsync: This This command has too many options that just confuses me and complicates things. Whereas I know where I am with dd.

I'd like to copy a partition to another laptop (to back it up). I'll connect the side-by-side laptops with an ethernet cable. To do the backup, I'd specifically like to use the "dd" command.

For simplicity, I haven't shown below the "netcat" commands (which provide the laptop-to-laptop communication) that I'll be using along with dd. So below is the effective command that I plan to run to do the backup:

$ dd if=/dev/sda6 of=/home/name/sda6.img

To restore the backup later, I plan to run

$ dd if=/home/name/sda6.img of=/dev/sda6

BUT I'VE READ that in order to do the latter command (which is a reversal of the first), the destination partition needs to be LARGER than the image file, even though I'm just putting the SAME DATA back where it came from.

This would involve me in increasing the size of the original partition, which might involve extensive work, which I'd rather not do.

SO MY QUESTION IS, for the restore, will I really need to increase the size of the destination partition, or will the data fit neatly back on the partition?

Also, if I WOULD need to increase the partition size with the above scenario, is there some tweak I can do to the dd commands that makes increasing the partition size unnecessary?

Added detail

I realise that the following are alternative ways to do such a backup, but I chose not to use them because of the reasons below:

tar: Apparently doesn't backup certain attributes or something like that.

cp: Apparrently doesn't backup certain things, like ACLs.

rsync: This command has too many options that just confuses me and complicates things. Whereas I know where I am with dd.

I'd like to copy a partition to another laptop (to back it up). I'll connect the side-by-side laptops with an ethernet cable. To do the backup, I'd specifically like to use the "dd" command.

For simplicity, I haven't shown below the "netcat" commands (which provide the laptop-to-laptop communication) that I'll be using along with dd. So below is the effective command that I plan to run to do the backup:

dd if=/dev/sda6 of=/home/name/sda6.img

To restore the backup later, I plan to run

dd if=/home/name/sda6.img of=/dev/sda6

BUT I'VE READ that in order to do the latter command (which is a reversal of the first), the destination partition needs to be LARGER than the image file, even though I'm just putting the SAME DATA back where it came from.

This would involve me in increasing the size of the original partition, which might involve extensive work, which I'd rather not do.

SO MY QUESTION IS, for the restore, will I really need to increase the size of the destination partition, or will the data fit neatly back on the partition?

Also, if I WOULD need to increase the partition size with the above scenario, is there some tweak I can do to the dd commands that makes increasing the partition size unnecessary?

Added detail

I realise that the following are alternative ways to do such a backup, but I chose not to use them because of the reasons below:

tar: Apparently doesn't backup certain attributes or something like that.

cp: Apparrently doesn't backup certain things, like ACLs.

rsync: This command has too many options that just confuses me and complicates things. Whereas I know where I am with dd.

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Do I need to increase original partition size if I'm simply restoring contents (with dd)?

I'd like to copy a partition to another laptop (to back it up). I'll connect the side-by-side laptops with an ethernet cable. To do the backup, I'd specifically like to use the "dd" command.

For simplicity, I haven't shown below the "netcat" commands (which provide the laptop-to-laptop communication) that I'll be using along with dd. So below is the effective command that I plan to run to do the backup:

$ dd if=/dev/sda6 of=/home/name/sda6.img

To restore the backup later, I plan to run

$ dd if=/home/name/sda6.img of=/dev/sda6

BUT I'VE READ that in order to do the latter command (which is a reversal of the first), the destination partition needs to be LARGER than the image file, even though I'm just putting the SAME DATA back where it came from.

This would involve me in increasing the size of the original partition, which might involve extensive work, which I'd rather not do.

SO MY QUESTION IS, for the restore, will I really need to increase the size of the destination partition, or will the data fit neatly back on the partition?

Also, if I WOULD need to increase the partition size with the above scenario, is there some tweak I can do to the dd commands that makes increasing the partition size unnecessary?

Added detail

I realise that the following are alternative ways to do such a backup, but I chose not to use them because of the reasons below:

tar: Apparently doesn't backup certain attributes or something like that.

cp: Apparrently doesn't backup certain things, like ACLs.

rsync: This command has too many options that just confuses me and complicates things. Whereas I know where I am with dd.