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An earlier questionAn earlier question got several nice answers involving stdin, none of which work in Firefox 9.0.1 (Edit: because I didn't read that you had to start a new Firefox process to make them work (thanks @manatwork):

  • echo '<h1>hello, world</h1>' | firefox /dev/fd/0 results in a new tab with the URL file:///dev/null and no text.
  • cat | firefox /dev/fd/0 results in a new tab with the URL file:///dev/null and no text. After typing a single line of text and pressing Enter it terminates and still doesn't show anything in the new tab.
  • firefox <( echo '<h1>hello, world</h1>' ) opens up a new tab with my profile folder, of all things.

Is there any way to make this work in Firefox 9.0.1 or newer?

As to the reason behind, it would be nice to be able to generate markup which is only stored in memory (barring swapping), and guarantee that there is no left-overs even in case of a power cut.

An earlier question got several nice answers involving stdin, none of which work in Firefox 9.0.1 (Edit: because I didn't read that you had to start a new Firefox process to make them work (thanks @manatwork):

  • echo '<h1>hello, world</h1>' | firefox /dev/fd/0 results in a new tab with the URL file:///dev/null and no text.
  • cat | firefox /dev/fd/0 results in a new tab with the URL file:///dev/null and no text. After typing a single line of text and pressing Enter it terminates and still doesn't show anything in the new tab.
  • firefox <( echo '<h1>hello, world</h1>' ) opens up a new tab with my profile folder, of all things.

Is there any way to make this work in Firefox 9.0.1 or newer?

As to the reason behind, it would be nice to be able to generate markup which is only stored in memory (barring swapping), and guarantee that there is no left-overs even in case of a power cut.

An earlier question got several nice answers involving stdin, none of which work in Firefox 9.0.1 (Edit: because I didn't read that you had to start a new Firefox process to make them work (thanks @manatwork):

  • echo '<h1>hello, world</h1>' | firefox /dev/fd/0 results in a new tab with the URL file:///dev/null and no text.
  • cat | firefox /dev/fd/0 results in a new tab with the URL file:///dev/null and no text. After typing a single line of text and pressing Enter it terminates and still doesn't show anything in the new tab.
  • firefox <( echo '<h1>hello, world</h1>' ) opens up a new tab with my profile folder, of all things.

Is there any way to make this work in Firefox 9.0.1 or newer?

As to the reason behind, it would be nice to be able to generate markup which is only stored in memory (barring swapping), and guarantee that there is no left-overs even in case of a power cut.

2 added 117 characters in body
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An earlier question got several nice answers involving stdin, none of which work in Firefox 9.0.1 (Edit: because I didn't read that you had to start a new Firefox process to make them work (thanks @manatwork):

  • echo '<h1>hello, world</h1>' | firefox /dev/fd/0 results in a new tab with the URL file:///dev/null and no text.
  • cat | firefox /dev/fd/0 results in a new tab with the URL file:///dev/null and no text. After typing a single line of text and pressing Enter it terminates and still doesn't show anything in the new tab.
  • firefox <( echo '<h1>hello, world</h1>' ) opens up a new tab with my profile folder, of all things.

Is there any way to make this work in Firefox 9.0.1 or newer?

As to the reason behind, it would be nice to be able to generate markup which is only stored in memory (barring swapping), and guarantee that there is no left-overs even in case of a power cut.

An earlier question got several nice answers involving stdin, none of which work in Firefox 9.0.1:

  • echo '<h1>hello, world</h1>' | firefox /dev/fd/0 results in a new tab with the URL file:///dev/null and no text.
  • cat | firefox /dev/fd/0 results in a new tab with the URL file:///dev/null and no text. After typing a single line of text and pressing Enter it terminates and still doesn't show anything in the new tab.
  • firefox <( echo '<h1>hello, world</h1>' ) opens up a new tab with my profile folder, of all things.

Is there any way to make this work in Firefox 9.0.1 or newer?

As to the reason behind, it would be nice to be able to generate markup which is only stored in memory (barring swapping), and guarantee that there is no left-overs even in case of a power cut.

An earlier question got several nice answers involving stdin, none of which work in Firefox 9.0.1 (Edit: because I didn't read that you had to start a new Firefox process to make them work (thanks @manatwork):

  • echo '<h1>hello, world</h1>' | firefox /dev/fd/0 results in a new tab with the URL file:///dev/null and no text.
  • cat | firefox /dev/fd/0 results in a new tab with the URL file:///dev/null and no text. After typing a single line of text and pressing Enter it terminates and still doesn't show anything in the new tab.
  • firefox <( echo '<h1>hello, world</h1>' ) opens up a new tab with my profile folder, of all things.

Is there any way to make this work in Firefox 9.0.1 or newer?

As to the reason behind, it would be nice to be able to generate markup which is only stored in memory (barring swapping), and guarantee that there is no left-overs even in case of a power cut.

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How to make Firefox 9 read stdin?

An earlier question got several nice answers involving stdin, none of which work in Firefox 9.0.1:

  • echo '<h1>hello, world</h1>' | firefox /dev/fd/0 results in a new tab with the URL file:///dev/null and no text.
  • cat | firefox /dev/fd/0 results in a new tab with the URL file:///dev/null and no text. After typing a single line of text and pressing Enter it terminates and still doesn't show anything in the new tab.
  • firefox <( echo '<h1>hello, world</h1>' ) opens up a new tab with my profile folder, of all things.

Is there any way to make this work in Firefox 9.0.1 or newer?

As to the reason behind, it would be nice to be able to generate markup which is only stored in memory (barring swapping), and guarantee that there is no left-overs even in case of a power cut.