2 Spelling/grammar tweaks
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The difference between those two commands is the quoted * character. If you call a command in a shell and use the * character for an argument, the shell itself will evaluate the argument. See this example:

$ ls
file1.zip  file2.zip  file3.zip  file4.txt

Now with a *:

$ ls *.zip
file1.zip  file2.zip  file3.zip

The shell evaluatedevaluates the wildcard and builtbuilds a command that looks as follows:

$ ls file1.zip  file2.zip  file3.zip

With a quoted wildcard, it is interpreted as filename, and thereforea file named (literally) ls*.zip means it's a file:

$ ls "*".zip
ls: cannot access *.zip: No such file or directory

The unzip utility cannot be called with multiple zipped files as arguments. But, the developper chooseddeveloper chose another way for this. From the manpage:

file[.zip]

[...] Wildcard expressions are similar to those supported in commonly used Unix shells (sh, ksh, csh) [...] (Be sure to quote any character that might otherwise be interpreted or modified by the operating system, particularly under Unix and VMS.)

The difference between those two commands is the quoted * character. If you call a command in a shell and use the * character for an argument, the shell itself will evaluate the argument. See this example:

$ ls
file1.zip  file2.zip  file3.zip  file4.txt

Now with a *:

$ ls *.zip
file1.zip  file2.zip  file3.zip

The shell evaluated the wildcard and built a command that looks as follows:

$ ls file1.zip  file2.zip  file3.zip

With a quoted wildcard, it is interpreted as filename, and therefore ls means it's a file:

$ ls "*".zip
ls: cannot access *.zip: No such file or directory

The unzip utility cannot be called with multiple zipped files as arguments. But, the developper choosed another way for this. From the manpage:

file[.zip]

[...] Wildcard expressions are similar to those supported in commonly used Unix shells (sh, ksh, csh) [...] (Be sure to quote any character that might otherwise be interpreted or modified by the operating system, particularly under Unix and VMS.)

The difference between those two commands is the quoted * character. If you call a command in a shell and use the * character for an argument, the shell itself will evaluate the argument. See this example:

$ ls
file1.zip  file2.zip  file3.zip  file4.txt

Now with a *:

$ ls *.zip
file1.zip  file2.zip  file3.zip

The shell evaluates the wildcard and builds a command as follows:

$ ls file1.zip  file2.zip  file3.zip

With a quoted wildcard, it is interpreted as a file named (literally) *.zip:

$ ls "*".zip
ls: cannot access *.zip: No such file or directory

The unzip utility cannot be called with multiple zipped files as arguments. But, the developer chose another way for this. From the manpage:

file[.zip]

[...] Wildcard expressions are similar to those supported in commonly used Unix shells (sh, ksh, csh) [...] (Be sure to quote any character that might otherwise be interpreted or modified by the operating system, particularly under Unix and VMS.)

1
source | link

The difference between those two commands is the quoted * character. If you call a command in a shell and use the * character for an argument, the shell itself will evaluate the argument. See this example:

$ ls
file1.zip  file2.zip  file3.zip  file4.txt

Now with a *:

$ ls *.zip
file1.zip  file2.zip  file3.zip

The shell evaluated the wildcard and built a command that looks as follows:

$ ls file1.zip  file2.zip  file3.zip

With a quoted wildcard, it is interpreted as filename, and therefore ls means it's a file:

$ ls "*".zip
ls: cannot access *.zip: No such file or directory

The unzip utility cannot be called with multiple zipped files as arguments. But, the developper choosed another way for this. From the manpage:

file[.zip]

[...] Wildcard expressions are similar to those supported in commonly used Unix shells (sh, ksh, csh) [...] (Be sure to quote any character that might otherwise be interpreted or modified by the operating system, particularly under Unix and VMS.)