2 Deleted the mystical twelfth byte; tweaked punctuation.
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Assuming the eleven sequences of eight zeros and ones are bytes, those bytes have the values:

72 101 108 108 111 32 87 111 114 108 100 101

This could easily represent a program, e.g., for an 8-bit processor like the MOS Technology 6502 or a 32-bit processor like the Inmos T800, but AFAIK not for any processor running Debian (the T800 can run a Unix alike).

Converting the values to their ASCII character representation gets you the 11 character-character string "Hello World". That string, however, is not a program. If you are looking for a program that generates such a string, you might want to start with compiling the following C program:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    puts("Hello World");
}

Assuming the eleven sequences of eight zeros and ones are bytes, those bytes have the values:

72 101 108 108 111 32 87 111 114 108 100 101

This could easily represent a program, e.g. for an 8-bit processor like the MOS Technology 6502 or a 32-bit processor like the Inmos T800, but AFAIK not for any processor running Debian (the T800 can run a Unix alike).

Converting the values to their ASCII character representation gets you the 11 character string "Hello World". That string however is not a program. If you are looking for a program that generates such a string, you might want to start with compiling the following C program:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    puts("Hello World");
}

Assuming the eleven sequences of eight zeros and ones are bytes, those bytes have the values:

72 101 108 108 111 32 87 111 114 108 100

This could easily represent a program, e.g., for an 8-bit processor like the MOS Technology 6502 or a 32-bit processor like the Inmos T800, but AFAIK not for any processor running Debian (the T800 can run a Unix alike).

Converting the values to their ASCII character representation gets you the 11-character string "Hello World". That string, however, is not a program. If you are looking for a program that generates such a string, you might want to start with compiling the following C program:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    puts("Hello World");
}
1
source | link

Assuming the eleven sequences of eight zeros and ones are bytes, those bytes have the values:

72 101 108 108 111 32 87 111 114 108 100 101

This could easily represent a program, e.g. for an 8-bit processor like the MOS Technology 6502 or a 32-bit processor like the Inmos T800, but AFAIK not for any processor running Debian (the T800 can run a Unix alike).

Converting the values to their ASCII character representation gets you the 11 character string "Hello World". That string however is not a program. If you are looking for a program that generates such a string, you might want to start with compiling the following C program:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    puts("Hello World");
}