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First off, sudo all by itself, doesn't send any emails or create warning messages, other than logging your unsuccessful attempt to the log. People who observe these logs and correlate events (most probably using a scripted log watcher), see that some user id, which happened to be yours this time, is trying to gain root access where he/she is not permitted. As a result, the automated process fires an email to the offender. Even though you think you might be responding to a human being, 9 out 10 times, your response goes into a mailbox, which is either not observed, or checked very seldom.

If you think you have received a response to your explanation from an actual human, who keeps accusing you after you made clear that this was a mistake and you were not on the right server, he is either too bored and looking for something to do or have strict orders to scare people off.

Other than brute force cracking attempts, there is no other threat vector in the wild at this time, attacking sudo protected servers, that I know.

Also, consider asking questions of this nature in the Information SecurityInformation Security section of Stack Exchange.

First off, sudo all by itself, doesn't send any emails or create warning messages, other than logging your unsuccessful attempt to the log. People who observe these logs and correlate events (most probably using a scripted log watcher), see that some user id, which happened to be yours this time, is trying to gain root access where he/she is not permitted. As a result, the automated process fires an email to the offender. Even though you think you might be responding to a human being, 9 out 10 times, your response goes into a mailbox, which is either not observed, or checked very seldom.

If you think you have received a response to your explanation from an actual human, who keeps accusing you after you made clear that this was a mistake and you were not on the right server, he is either too bored and looking for something to do or have strict orders to scare people off.

Other than brute force cracking attempts, there is no other threat vector in the wild at this time, attacking sudo protected servers, that I know.

Also, consider asking questions of this nature in the Information Security section of Stack Exchange.

First off, sudo all by itself, doesn't send any emails or create warning messages, other than logging your unsuccessful attempt to the log. People who observe these logs and correlate events (most probably using a scripted log watcher), see that some user id, which happened to be yours this time, is trying to gain root access where he/she is not permitted. As a result, the automated process fires an email to the offender. Even though you think you might be responding to a human being, 9 out 10 times, your response goes into a mailbox, which is either not observed, or checked very seldom.

If you think you have received a response to your explanation from an actual human, who keeps accusing you after you made clear that this was a mistake and you were not on the right server, he is either too bored and looking for something to do or have strict orders to scare people off.

Other than brute force cracking attempts, there is no other threat vector in the wild at this time, attacking sudo protected servers, that I know.

Also, consider asking questions of this nature in the Information Security section of Stack Exchange.

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First off, sudo all by itself, doesn't send any emails or create warning messages, other than logging your unsuccessful attempt to the log. People who observe these logs and correlate events (most probably using a scripted log watcher), see that some user id, which happened to be yours this time, is trying to gain root access where he/she is not permitted. As a result, the automated process fires an email to the offender. Even though you think you might be responding to a human being, 9 out 10 times, your response goes into a mailbox, which is either not observed, or checked very seldom.

If you think you have received a response to your explanation from an actual human, who keeps accusing you after you made clear that this was a mistake and you were not on the right server, he is either too bored and looking for something to do or have strict orders to scare people off.

Other than brute force cracking attempts, there is no other threat vector in the wild at this time, attacking sudo protected servers, that I know.

Also, consider asking questions of this nature in the Information Security section of Stack Exchange.