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When you setup a new Ubuntu or OS X installation a user is generally created for you. On OS X it is whatever username you pick. On Ubuntu (the server version) usually the ubuntu user is created.

The way I understand it, there is also a root accountuser, which you can access via something like sudo su - root, and entering the password of the ubuntu or the user you created, which is part of the administrators group. Once you switch to root I think you can use the passwd command and change root's password.

But what was root's password before that? Does it exist? Is it a random string of numbers and letters? How does the system deal with that?

When you setup a new Ubuntu or OS X installation a user is generally created for you. On OS X it is whatever username you pick. On Ubuntu (the server version) usually the ubuntu user is created.

The way I understand it, there is also a root account, which you can access via something like sudo su - root, and entering the password of the ubuntu or the user you created, which is part of the administrators group. Once you switch to root I think you can use the passwd command and change root's password.

But what was root's password before that? Does it exist? Is it a random string of numbers and letters? How does the system deal with that?

When you setup a new Ubuntu or OS X installation a user is generally created for you. On OS X it is whatever username you pick. On Ubuntu (the server version) usually the ubuntu user is created.

The way I understand it, there is also a root user, which you can access via something like sudo su - root, and entering the password of the ubuntu or the user you created, which is part of the administrators group. Once you switch to root I think you can use the passwd command and change root's password.

But what was root's password before that? Does it exist? Is it a random string of numbers and letters? How does the system deal with that?

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Is there a root password on OS X and Ubuntu?

When you setup a new Ubuntu or OS X installation a user is generally created for you. On OS X it is whatever username you pick. On Ubuntu (the server version) usually the ubuntu user is created.

The way I understand it, there is also a root account, which you can access via something like sudo su - root, and entering the password of the ubuntu or the user you created, which is part of the administrators group. Once you switch to root I think you can use the passwd command and change root's password.

But what was root's password before that? Does it exist? Is it a random string of numbers and letters? How does the system deal with that?