4 replaced http://stackoverflow.com/ with https://stackoverflow.com/
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The linux manual pages say

the standard input and output streams are fully buffered if and only if the streams do not refer to an interactive device.

So you may need to generate a lot of output (4096 bytes) before something shows up in the output.

If there is a regular way to stop pocketsphinx, and if it is implemented correctly, it should flush the buffers to the output file when you stop it. This would at least prove the buffering theory, but of course it would not help you yet in getting the output in time.

This answerThis answer or others for the respective question may help.

The linux manual pages say

the standard input and output streams are fully buffered if and only if the streams do not refer to an interactive device.

So you may need to generate a lot of output (4096 bytes) before something shows up in the output.

If there is a regular way to stop pocketsphinx, and if it is implemented correctly, it should flush the buffers to the output file when you stop it. This would at least prove the buffering theory, but of course it would not help you yet in getting the output in time.

This answer or others for the respective question may help.

The linux manual pages say

the standard input and output streams are fully buffered if and only if the streams do not refer to an interactive device.

So you may need to generate a lot of output (4096 bytes) before something shows up in the output.

If there is a regular way to stop pocketsphinx, and if it is implemented correctly, it should flush the buffers to the output file when you stop it. This would at least prove the buffering theory, but of course it would not help you yet in getting the output in time.

This answer or others for the respective question may help.

3 added link to possible solution for the line buffering problem.
source | link

The linux manual pages say

the standard input and output streams are fully buffered if and only if the streams do not refer to an interactive device.

So you may need to generate a lot of output (4096 bytes) before something shows up in the output.

If there is a regular way to stop pocketsphinx, and if it is implemented correctly, it should flush the buffers to the output file when you stop it. This would at least prove the buffering theory, but of course it would not help you yet in getting the output in time.

This answer or others for the respective question may help.

The linux manual pages say

the standard input and output streams are fully buffered if and only if the streams do not refer to an interactive device.

So you may need to generate a lot of output (4096 bytes) before something shows up in the output.

If there is a regular way to stop pocketsphinx, and if it is implemented correctly, it should flush the buffers to the output file when you stop it. This would at least prove the buffering theory, but of course it would not help you yet in getting the output in time.

The linux manual pages say

the standard input and output streams are fully buffered if and only if the streams do not refer to an interactive device.

So you may need to generate a lot of output (4096 bytes) before something shows up in the output.

If there is a regular way to stop pocketsphinx, and if it is implemented correctly, it should flush the buffers to the output file when you stop it. This would at least prove the buffering theory, but of course it would not help you yet in getting the output in time.

This answer or others for the respective question may help.

2 completely re-written after more research
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To verify that something is written at all to stdout after redirecting, jump on the process withThe strace like so:linux manual pages say

sudo strace -f -p XXXX -e write

the standard input and output streams are fully buffered if and only if the streams do not refer to an interactive device.

where XXXX is the PIDSo you may need to generate a lot of pockesphinx.output

Then, eventually, you should see(4096 bytes) before something like thisshows up in the output.

write(1, "HELLO\n", 6)                  = 6

which demonstrates that outputIf there is going outa regular way to stdout. The 1 after write denotes stdout.

The reason whystop pocketsphinx, and if it does not show up inis implemented correctly, it should flush the buffers to the output file then likely is that pocketsphinx does not use linewhen you stop it. This would at least prove the buffering theory, but rather uses an output buffer of maybe 1024 or more bytes.

Yet, according to http://stackoverflow.com/a/3746795, stdout should actually be line buffered, so there is a chance you docourse it would not even see a call to write()help you yet in getting the output, because the applications does internal buffering in time.

To verify that something is written at all to stdout after redirecting, jump on the process with strace like so:

sudo strace -f -p XXXX -e write

where XXXX is the PID of pockesphinx.

Then, eventually, you should see something like this in the output

write(1, "HELLO\n", 6)                  = 6

which demonstrates that output is going out to stdout. The 1 after write denotes stdout.

The reason why it does not show up in the output file then likely is that pocketsphinx does not use line buffering, but rather uses an output buffer of maybe 1024 or more bytes.

Yet, according to http://stackoverflow.com/a/3746795, stdout should actually be line buffered, so there is a chance you do not even see a call to write() in the output, because the applications does internal buffering.

The linux manual pages say

the standard input and output streams are fully buffered if and only if the streams do not refer to an interactive device.

So you may need to generate a lot of output (4096 bytes) before something shows up in the output.

If there is a regular way to stop pocketsphinx, and if it is implemented correctly, it should flush the buffers to the output file when you stop it. This would at least prove the buffering theory, but of course it would not help you yet in getting the output in time.

1
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