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11 added 114 characters in body
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Your approach is not taking in account that contrary to other common protocols, FTP uses both port 20 and port 21 over TCP by default.

The term passive refers that the protocol is slightly better behaved than the initial implementations.

Here is a link:

http://www.slacksite.com/other/ftp.html

Port 20/TCP is used for data, and port 21/TCP for commands.

In Unix, also privileged ports < 1024, only can be bound by root.

So either you do:

sudo ssh -f -N -L 20:130.89.148.12:20 -L 21:130.89.148.12:21 user@44.44.44.44

This way you do not give any extra port, and only use it with

ftp -p localhost

or if you do not have root:

ssh -f -N -L 2120:130.89.148.12:20 -L 2121:130.89.148.12:21 user@44.44.44.44

and then use:

ftp -p -P 2121 localhost 

From man ftp http://linux.die.net/man/1/ftp

-p passive mode
-P port

or if with a version of ftp that does not support -P (Debian 9/Ubuntu 16.04):

ftp -p localhost 2121

I will also leave a link to "SSH tunnels local and remote port forwarding explained"

http://blog.trackets.com/2014/05/17/ssh-tunnel-local-and-remote-port-forwarding-explained-with-examples.html

Lastly, I would advise on not using root in the remote system for ssh connections. root is a very powerful account, and should only be reserved for system administration.

Furthermore, in many modern Linuxes ssh remote login as root comes disabled by default.

Why is root login via SSH so bad that everyone advises to disable it?

Your approach is not taking in account that contrary to other common protocols, FTP uses both port 20 and port 21 over TCP by default.

The term passive refers that the protocol is slightly better behaved than the initial implementations.

Here is a link:

http://www.slacksite.com/other/ftp.html

Port 20/TCP is used for data, and port 21/TCP for commands.

In Unix, also privileged ports < 1024, only can be bound by root.

So either you do:

sudo ssh -f -N -L 20:130.89.148.12:20 -L 21:130.89.148.12:21 user@44.44.44.44

This way you do not give any extra port, and only use it with

ftp -p localhost

or if you do not have root:

ssh -f -N -L 2120:130.89.148.12:20 -L 2121:130.89.148.12:21 user@44.44.44.44

and then use:

ftp -p -P 2121 localhost 

From man ftp http://linux.die.net/man/1/ftp

-p passive mode
-P port

I will also leave a link to "SSH tunnels local and remote port forwarding explained"

http://blog.trackets.com/2014/05/17/ssh-tunnel-local-and-remote-port-forwarding-explained-with-examples.html

Lastly, I would advise on not using root in the remote system for ssh connections. root is a very powerful account, and should only be reserved for system administration.

Furthermore, in many modern Linuxes ssh remote login as root comes disabled by default.

Why is root login via SSH so bad that everyone advises to disable it?

Your approach is not taking in account that contrary to other common protocols, FTP uses both port 20 and port 21 over TCP by default.

The term passive refers that the protocol is slightly better behaved than the initial implementations.

Here is a link:

http://www.slacksite.com/other/ftp.html

Port 20/TCP is used for data, and port 21/TCP for commands.

In Unix, also privileged ports < 1024, only can be bound by root.

So either you do:

sudo ssh -f -N -L 20:130.89.148.12:20 -L 21:130.89.148.12:21 user@44.44.44.44

This way you do not give any extra port, and only use it with

ftp -p localhost

or if you do not have root:

ssh -f -N -L 2120:130.89.148.12:20 -L 2121:130.89.148.12:21 user@44.44.44.44

and then use:

ftp -p -P 2121 localhost 

From man ftp http://linux.die.net/man/1/ftp

-p passive mode
-P port

or if with a version of ftp that does not support -P (Debian 9/Ubuntu 16.04):

ftp -p localhost 2121

I will also leave a link to "SSH tunnels local and remote port forwarding explained"

http://blog.trackets.com/2014/05/17/ssh-tunnel-local-and-remote-port-forwarding-explained-with-examples.html

Lastly, I would advise on not using root in the remote system for ssh connections. root is a very powerful account, and should only be reserved for system administration.

Furthermore, in many modern Linuxes ssh remote login as root comes disabled by default.

Why is root login via SSH so bad that everyone advises to disable it?

10 added 13 characters in body
source | link

Your approach is not taking in account that contrary to other common protocols, FTP uses both port 20 and port 21 over TCP by default.

The term passive refers that the protocol is slightly better behaved than the initial implementations.

Here is a link:

http://www.slacksite.com/other/ftp.html

Port 20/TCP is used for data, and port 21/TCP for commands.

In Unix, also privileged ports < 1024, only can be bound by root.

So either you do:

sudo ssh -f -N -L 20:130.89.148.12:20 -L 21:130.89.148.12:21 user@44.44.44.44

This way you do not give any extra port, and only use it with

ftp -p localhost

or if you do not have root:

ssh -f -N -L 2120:130.89.148.12:20 -L 2121:130.89.148.12:21 user@44.44.44.44

and then use:

ftp -p -P 2121 localhost 

From man ftp http://linux.die.net/man/1/ftp

-p passive mode
-P port

I will also leave a link to "SSH tunnels local and remote port forwarding explained"

http://blog.trackets.com/2014/05/17/ssh-tunnel-local-and-remote-port-forwarding-explained-with-examples.html

Lastly, I would advise on not using root in the remote system for ssh connections. root is a very powerful account, and should only be reserved for system administration.

Furthermore, in many modern Linuxes ssh remote login as root comes disabled by default.

Why is root login via SSH so bad that everyone advises to disable it?

Your approach is not taking in account that contrary to other common protocols, FTP uses both port 20 and port 21 over TCP.

The term passive refers that the protocol is slightly better behaved than the initial implementations.

Here is a link:

http://www.slacksite.com/other/ftp.html

Port 20/TCP is used for data, and port 21/TCP for commands.

In Unix, also privileged ports < 1024, only can be bound by root.

So either you do:

sudo ssh -f -N -L 20:130.89.148.12:20 -L 21:130.89.148.12:21 user@44.44.44.44

This way you do not give any extra port, and only use it with

ftp -p localhost

or if you do not have root:

ssh -f -N -L 2120:130.89.148.12:20 -L 2121:130.89.148.12:21 user@44.44.44.44

and then use:

ftp -p -P 2121 localhost 

From man ftp http://linux.die.net/man/1/ftp

-p passive mode
-P port

I will also leave a link to "SSH tunnels local and remote port forwarding explained"

http://blog.trackets.com/2014/05/17/ssh-tunnel-local-and-remote-port-forwarding-explained-with-examples.html

Lastly, I would advise on not using root in the remote system for ssh connections. root is a very powerful account, and should only be reserved for system administration.

Furthermore, in many modern Linuxes ssh remote login as root comes disabled by default.

Why is root login via SSH so bad that everyone advises to disable it?

Your approach is not taking in account that contrary to other common protocols, FTP uses both port 20 and port 21 over TCP by default.

The term passive refers that the protocol is slightly better behaved than the initial implementations.

Here is a link:

http://www.slacksite.com/other/ftp.html

Port 20/TCP is used for data, and port 21/TCP for commands.

In Unix, also privileged ports < 1024, only can be bound by root.

So either you do:

sudo ssh -f -N -L 20:130.89.148.12:20 -L 21:130.89.148.12:21 user@44.44.44.44

This way you do not give any extra port, and only use it with

ftp -p localhost

or if you do not have root:

ssh -f -N -L 2120:130.89.148.12:20 -L 2121:130.89.148.12:21 user@44.44.44.44

and then use:

ftp -p -P 2121 localhost 

From man ftp http://linux.die.net/man/1/ftp

-p passive mode
-P port

I will also leave a link to "SSH tunnels local and remote port forwarding explained"

http://blog.trackets.com/2014/05/17/ssh-tunnel-local-and-remote-port-forwarding-explained-with-examples.html

Lastly, I would advise on not using root in the remote system for ssh connections. root is a very powerful account, and should only be reserved for system administration.

Furthermore, in many modern Linuxes ssh remote login as root comes disabled by default.

Why is root login via SSH so bad that everyone advises to disable it?

9 added 4 characters in body
source | link

Your approach is not taking in account that contrary to other common protocolosprotocols, FTP uses both port 20 and port 21 over TCP.

The term passive refers that the protocol is a slightly better behaved than the initial implementations.

Here is a link:

http://www.slacksite.com/other/ftp.html

Port 20/TCP is used for data, and port 21/TCP for commands.

In Unix, also privileged ports < 1024, only can be bound by root.

So either you do:

sudo ssh -f -N -L 20:130.89.148.12:20 -L 21:130.89.148.12:21 user@44.44.44.44

This way you do not give any extra port, and only use it with

ftp -p localhost

or if you do not have root:

ssh -f -N -L 2120:130.89.148.12:20 -L 2121:130.89.148.12:21 user@44.44.44.44

and then use:

ftp -p -P 2121 localhost 

From man ftp http://linux.die.net/man/1/ftp

-p passive mode
-P port

I will also leave a link to "SSH tunnels local and remote port forwarding explained"

http://blog.trackets.com/2014/05/17/ssh-tunnel-local-and-remote-port-forwarding-explained-with-examples.html

Lastly, I would advise on not using root in the remote system for ssh connections. root is a very powerful account, and should only be reserved for system administration. 

Furthermore, in many modern Linuxes ssh remote login as root comes disabled by default.

Why is root login via SSH so bad that everyone advises to disable it?

Your approach is not taking in account that contrary to other common protocolos, FTP uses both port 20 and port 21 over TCP.

The term passive refers that the protocol is a slightly better behaved than the initial implementations.

Here is a link:

http://www.slacksite.com/other/ftp.html

Port 20/TCP is used for data, and port 21/TCP for commands.

In Unix, also privileged ports < 1024, only can be bound by root.

So either you do:

sudo ssh -f -N -L 20:130.89.148.12:20 -L 21:130.89.148.12:21 user@44.44.44.44

This way you do not give any extra port, and only use it with

ftp -p localhost

or if you do not have root:

ssh -f -N -L 2120:130.89.148.12:20 -L 2121:130.89.148.12:21 user@44.44.44.44

and then use:

ftp -p -P 2121 localhost 

From man ftp http://linux.die.net/man/1/ftp

-p passive mode
-P port

I will also leave a link "SSH tunnels local and remote port forwarding explained"

http://blog.trackets.com/2014/05/17/ssh-tunnel-local-and-remote-port-forwarding-explained-with-examples.html

Lastly, I would advise on not using root in the remote system for ssh connections. root is a very powerful account, and should only be reserved for system administration. Furthermore, in many modern Linuxes ssh remote login as root comes disabled by default.

Why is root login via SSH so bad that everyone advises to disable it?

Your approach is not taking in account that contrary to other common protocols, FTP uses both port 20 and port 21 over TCP.

The term passive refers that the protocol is slightly better behaved than the initial implementations.

Here is a link:

http://www.slacksite.com/other/ftp.html

Port 20/TCP is used for data, and port 21/TCP for commands.

In Unix, also privileged ports < 1024, only can be bound by root.

So either you do:

sudo ssh -f -N -L 20:130.89.148.12:20 -L 21:130.89.148.12:21 user@44.44.44.44

This way you do not give any extra port, and only use it with

ftp -p localhost

or if you do not have root:

ssh -f -N -L 2120:130.89.148.12:20 -L 2121:130.89.148.12:21 user@44.44.44.44

and then use:

ftp -p -P 2121 localhost 

From man ftp http://linux.die.net/man/1/ftp

-p passive mode
-P port

I will also leave a link to "SSH tunnels local and remote port forwarding explained"

http://blog.trackets.com/2014/05/17/ssh-tunnel-local-and-remote-port-forwarding-explained-with-examples.html

Lastly, I would advise on not using root in the remote system for ssh connections. root is a very powerful account, and should only be reserved for system administration. 

Furthermore, in many modern Linuxes ssh remote login as root comes disabled by default.

Why is root login via SSH so bad that everyone advises to disable it?

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