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4 Copy edited (e.g. ref. <http://www.wikihow.com/Use-Than-and-Then>).
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Background

The main reason why you need any program like minicom to communicate over a serial port is that the port needs to be set up prior to initiating a connection. If it weren't set up appropriately, the cat and echo commands would not do for you what you might have expected. Notice that once you run a program like minicom, the port is left with the settings that minicom used. You can query the communication settings using the stty program like this:

stty < /dev/ttyS0

If you have done it right; after booting the computer and before running any other program like minicom, the communication settings will be at their default settings. These are probably different thenthan what you will need to make your connection. In this situation, sending the commands cat or echo to the port will either produce garbage or not work at all.

Run stty again after using minicom, and you'll notice the settings are set to what the program was using.

Minimal serial communication

Basically, what needs to be done in ordertwo things are needed to have two-way communication through a serial port, is: 1) configuring the serial port, and 2) opening the pseudo-tty read-write.

The most basic program that I know that does this is picocom. You can also use a tool like setserial to set up the port and then interact with it directly from the shell.

Background

The main reason why you need any program like minicom to communicate over a serial port is that the port needs to be set up prior to initiating a connection. If it weren't set up appropriately, the cat and echo commands would not do for you what you might have expected. Notice that once you run a program like minicom, the port is left with the settings that minicom used. You can query the communication settings using stty program like this:

stty < /dev/ttyS0

If you have done it right; after booting the computer and before running any other program like minicom, the communication settings will be at their default settings. These are probably different then what you will need to make your connection. In this situation, sending the commands cat or echo to the port will either produce garbage or not work at all.

Run stty again after using minicom and you'll notice the settings are set to what the program was using.

Minimal serial communication

Basically, what needs to be done in order to have two-way communication through a serial port, is: 1) configuring the serial port, and 2) opening the pseudo-tty read-write.

The most basic program that I know that does this is picocom. You can also use a tool like setserial to set up the port and then interact with it directly from the shell.

Background

The main reason why you need any program like minicom to communicate over a serial port is that the port needs to be set up prior to initiating a connection. If it weren't set up appropriately, the cat and echo commands would not do for you what you might have expected. Notice that once you run a program like minicom, the port is left with the settings that minicom used. You can query the communication settings using the stty program like this:

stty < /dev/ttyS0

If you have done it right; after booting the computer and before running any other program like minicom, the communication settings will be at their default settings. These are probably different than what you will need to make your connection. In this situation, sending the commands cat or echo to the port will either produce garbage or not work at all.

Run stty again after using minicom, and you'll notice the settings are set to what the program was using.

Minimal serial communication

Basically, two things are needed to have two-way communication through a serial port: 1) configuring the serial port, and 2) opening the pseudo-tty read-write.

The most basic program that I know that does this is picocom. You can also use a tool like setserial to set up the port and then interact with it directly from the shell.

3 Improved spelling and English grammer.
source | link

Background

The main reason why you need any program like minicom to communicate over a serial port is that the port needs to be set up prior to initiating a connection. If it weren't set up appropriately, the cat and echo commands would not do for you what you might have expected. Notice that once you run a program like minicom, the port is left with the settings that minicom used. You can query the communication settings using stty program like this:

stty < /dev/ttyS0

If you dohave done it rightright; after booting (beforethe computer and before running any other program like minicom,), the communication settings will be at their defaults, which isdefault settings. These are probably different fromthen what you will need to use formake your connection. In this situation, sending the commands cat-ing from or echo-ing to the port will either produce garbage or not work at all.

Run stty again after using minicom and you'll notice the settings are set to what the program was using.

Minimal serial communication

Basically, what needs to be done in order forto have two-way communication through a serial port, is: 1) configuring the serial port, and 2) opening the pseudo-tty read-write. The

The most basic program that I know of that does this is picocom. You can also use a tool like setserial to set up the port and then interact with it directly from the shell.

Background

The main reason why you need any program like minicom to communicate over a serial port is that the port needs to be set up prior to initiating a connection. If it weren't set up appropriately, the cat and echo would not for you what you might have expected. Notice that once you run a program like minicom, the port is left with the settings that minicom used. You can query the communication settings using stty program like this:

stty < /dev/ttyS0

If you do it right after booting (before running any program like minicom), the communication settings will be at their defaults, which is probably different from what you need to use for your connection. In this situation, cat-ing from or echo-ing to the port will either produce garbage or not work at all.

Run stty again after using minicom and you'll notice the settings are set to what the program was using.

Minimal serial communication

Basically, what needs to be done in order for two-way communication through serial port, is 1) configuring the port 2) opening the pseudo-tty read-write. The most basic program I know of that does this is picocom. You can also use a tool like setserial to set up the port and then interact with it directly from the shell.

Background

The main reason why you need any program like minicom to communicate over a serial port is that the port needs to be set up prior to initiating a connection. If it weren't set up appropriately, the cat and echo commands would not do for you what you might have expected. Notice that once you run a program like minicom, the port is left with the settings that minicom used. You can query the communication settings using stty program like this:

stty < /dev/ttyS0

If you have done it right; after booting the computer and before running any other program like minicom, the communication settings will be at their default settings. These are probably different then what you will need to make your connection. In this situation, sending the commands cat or echo to the port will either produce garbage or not work at all.

Run stty again after using minicom and you'll notice the settings are set to what the program was using.

Minimal serial communication

Basically, what needs to be done in order to have two-way communication through a serial port, is: 1) configuring the serial port, and 2) opening the pseudo-tty read-write.

The most basic program that I know that does this is picocom. You can also use a tool like setserial to set up the port and then interact with it directly from the shell.

2 Improved gramer for clarity.
source | link

Background

The main reason why you need any program like minicom to communicate over a serial port is that the port needs to be set up prior to initiating a connection. If it weren't set up appropriately, the cat and echo would not for you aswhat you might have expected. Notice that once you run a program like minicom, the port is left with a a set ofthe settings that minicom used. You can query the communication settings using stty program like this:

stty < /dev/ttyS0

If you do it right after booting (before running any program like minicom), the communication settings will be at their defaults, which is probably different from what you need to use for your connection. In this situation, cat-ing from or echo-ing to the port will either produce garbage or not work at all.

Run stty again after using minicom and you'll notice the settings are set to what the program was using.

Minimal serial communication

Basically, what needs to be done in order for two-way communication through serial port, is 1) configuring the port 2) opening the pseudo-tty read-write. The most basic program I know of that does this is picocom. You can also use a tool like setserial to set up the port and then interact with it directly from the shell.

Background

The main reason why you need any program like minicom to communicate over a serial port is that the port needs to be set up prior to initiating a connection. If it weren't set up appropriately, the cat and echo would not for you as expected. Notice that once you run a program like minicom, the port is left with a a set of settings that minicom used. You can query the communication settings using stty program like this:

stty < /dev/ttyS0

If you do it right after booting (before running any program like minicom), the communication settings will be at their defaults, which is probably different from what you need to use for your connection. In this situation, cat-ing from or echo-ing to the port will either produce garbage or not work at all.

Run stty again after using minicom and you'll notice the settings are set to what the program was using.

Minimal serial communication

Basically, what needs to be done in order for two-way communication through serial port, is 1) configuring the port 2) opening the pseudo-tty read-write. The most basic program I know of that does this is picocom. You can also use a tool like setserial to set up the port and then interact with it directly from the shell.

Background

The main reason why you need any program like minicom to communicate over a serial port is that the port needs to be set up prior to initiating a connection. If it weren't set up appropriately, the cat and echo would not for you what you might have expected. Notice that once you run a program like minicom, the port is left with the settings that minicom used. You can query the communication settings using stty program like this:

stty < /dev/ttyS0

If you do it right after booting (before running any program like minicom), the communication settings will be at their defaults, which is probably different from what you need to use for your connection. In this situation, cat-ing from or echo-ing to the port will either produce garbage or not work at all.

Run stty again after using minicom and you'll notice the settings are set to what the program was using.

Minimal serial communication

Basically, what needs to be done in order for two-way communication through serial port, is 1) configuring the port 2) opening the pseudo-tty read-write. The most basic program I know of that does this is picocom. You can also use a tool like setserial to set up the port and then interact with it directly from the shell.

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