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You'll need a combination of commands, depending on your Ubuntu version. Before systemd became the init system (pre-15.04), the following would suffice:

service --status-all # for sysv init scripts
initctl list         # for Upstart jobs

Some services might be listed by both service and initctl, in which case the Upstart job would usually be the right one.

For the case of systemd, John Petit's answerJohn Petit's answer provides the necessary commands.

You'll need a combination of commands, depending on your Ubuntu version. Before systemd became the init system (pre-15.04), the following would suffice:

service --status-all # for sysv init scripts
initctl list         # for Upstart jobs

Some services might be listed by both service and initctl, in which case the Upstart job would usually be the right one.

For the case of systemd, John Petit's answer provides the necessary commands.

You'll need a combination of commands, depending on your Ubuntu version. Before systemd became the init system (pre-15.04), the following would suffice:

service --status-all # for sysv init scripts
initctl list         # for Upstart jobs

Some services might be listed by both service and initctl, in which case the Upstart job would usually be the right one.

For the case of systemd, John Petit's answer provides the necessary commands.

1
source | link

You'll need a combination of commands, depending on your Ubuntu version. Before systemd became the init system (pre-15.04), the following would suffice:

service --status-all # for sysv init scripts
initctl list         # for Upstart jobs

Some services might be listed by both service and initctl, in which case the Upstart job would usually be the right one.

For the case of systemd, John Petit's answer provides the necessary commands.