The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.
2 Clarification on some points
source | link

I found a way to make this work in OpenSUSE, and I hope it won't be too different in Mint. Maybe your files will be in slightly different locations, but it shouldn't be too hard to find the right ones.

OpenSUSE uses ibus by default (or, at least, the Gnome version does), but I got rid of it and used xim. I don't know if Mint also uses ibus but, in any case, I'm posting the complete instructions. Skip/adapt the steps as necessary.

  1. Uninstall ibus. In OpenSUSE, that's sudo zypper rm ibus. Logout and login again to kill the zombie daemons.

  2. Install gtk3-immodule-xim. In OpenSUSE, it's sudo zypper in gtk3-immodule-xim.

  3. Edit /etc/X11/xim.d/none. Set XMODIFIERS to @im=none. Set GTK_IM_MODULE and QT_IM_MODULE to xim.

  4. cp /usr/share/X11/locale/en_US.UTF-8/Compose ~/.XCompose. If there's a .XCompose file in your home directory, X11 will use it. So now we can edit this file to customize the dead keys.

  5. Now, the boring part. Edit the .XCompose file and create rules for each combination of dead keys, outputting the desired string. For example:

    <dead_acute> <b> : "'b"
    <dead_acute> <r> : "'r"
    ...
    

    Remember to create rules for uppercase letters, too (and punctuation, and anything you need).

  6. If, like me, you also want to get cedilla (ç) instead of accented c (ć) when using <dead_acute> <c>, simply find and edit those lines too.

And there you have it. Logout and login again, and all the applications should handle input correctly!

EDIT: I'm aware that xim is old and buggy (it says so on the config file), but the above was the only way I could get everything working. Maybe uim also does the job.

I found a way to make this work in OpenSUSE, and I hope it won't be too different in Mint. Maybe your files will be in slightly different locations, but it shouldn't be too hard to find the right ones.

OpenSUSE uses ibus by default, but I got rid of it and used xim. I don't know if Mint also uses ibus but, in any case, I'm posting the complete instructions. Skip/adapt the steps as necessary.

  1. Uninstall ibus. In OpenSUSE, that's sudo zypper rm ibus. Logout and login again to kill the zombie daemons.

  2. Install gtk3-immodule-xim. In OpenSUSE, it's sudo zypper in gtk3-immodule-xim.

  3. Edit /etc/X11/xim.d/none. Set XMODIFIERS to @im=none. Set GTK_IM_MODULE and QT_IM_MODULE to xim.

  4. cp /usr/share/X11/locale/en_US.UTF-8/Compose ~/.XCompose. If there's a .XCompose file in your home directory, X11 will use it. So now we can edit this file to customize the dead keys.

  5. Now, the boring part. Edit the .XCompose file and create rules for each combination of dead keys, outputting the desired string. For example:

    <dead_acute> <b> : "'b"
    <dead_acute> <r> : "'r"
    ...
    

    Remember to create rules for uppercase letters, too (and punctuation, and anything you need).

  6. If, like me, you also want to get cedilla (ç) instead of accented c (ć) when using <dead_acute> <c>, simply find and edit those lines too.

And there you have it. Logout and login again, and all the applications should handle input correctly!

I found a way to make this work in OpenSUSE, and I hope it won't be too different in Mint. Maybe your files will be in slightly different locations, but it shouldn't be too hard to find the right ones.

OpenSUSE uses ibus by default (or, at least, the Gnome version does), but I got rid of it and used xim. I don't know if Mint also uses ibus but, in any case, I'm posting the complete instructions. Skip/adapt the steps as necessary.

  1. Uninstall ibus. In OpenSUSE, that's sudo zypper rm ibus. Logout and login again to kill the zombie daemons.

  2. Install gtk3-immodule-xim. In OpenSUSE, it's sudo zypper in gtk3-immodule-xim.

  3. Edit /etc/X11/xim.d/none. Set XMODIFIERS to @im=none. Set GTK_IM_MODULE and QT_IM_MODULE to xim.

  4. cp /usr/share/X11/locale/en_US.UTF-8/Compose ~/.XCompose. If there's a .XCompose file in your home directory, X11 will use it. So now we can edit this file to customize the dead keys.

  5. Now, the boring part. Edit the .XCompose file and create rules for each combination of dead keys, outputting the desired string. For example:

    <dead_acute> <b> : "'b"
    <dead_acute> <r> : "'r"
    ...
    

    Remember to create rules for uppercase letters, too (and punctuation, and anything you need).

  6. If, like me, you also want to get cedilla (ç) instead of accented c (ć) when using <dead_acute> <c>, simply find and edit those lines too.

And there you have it. Logout and login again, and all the applications should handle input correctly!

EDIT: I'm aware that xim is old and buggy (it says so on the config file), but the above was the only way I could get everything working. Maybe uim also does the job.

1
source | link

I found a way to make this work in OpenSUSE, and I hope it won't be too different in Mint. Maybe your files will be in slightly different locations, but it shouldn't be too hard to find the right ones.

OpenSUSE uses ibus by default, but I got rid of it and used xim. I don't know if Mint also uses ibus but, in any case, I'm posting the complete instructions. Skip/adapt the steps as necessary.

  1. Uninstall ibus. In OpenSUSE, that's sudo zypper rm ibus. Logout and login again to kill the zombie daemons.

  2. Install gtk3-immodule-xim. In OpenSUSE, it's sudo zypper in gtk3-immodule-xim.

  3. Edit /etc/X11/xim.d/none. Set XMODIFIERS to @im=none. Set GTK_IM_MODULE and QT_IM_MODULE to xim.

  4. cp /usr/share/X11/locale/en_US.UTF-8/Compose ~/.XCompose. If there's a .XCompose file in your home directory, X11 will use it. So now we can edit this file to customize the dead keys.

  5. Now, the boring part. Edit the .XCompose file and create rules for each combination of dead keys, outputting the desired string. For example:

    <dead_acute> <b> : "'b"
    <dead_acute> <r> : "'r"
    ...
    

    Remember to create rules for uppercase letters, too (and punctuation, and anything you need).

  6. If, like me, you also want to get cedilla (ç) instead of accented c (ć) when using <dead_acute> <c>, simply find and edit those lines too.

And there you have it. Logout and login again, and all the applications should handle input correctly!