2 Corrected silliness
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If your shell supports them, the simplest way of doing such manipulations would be to use process substitution: <(…) and >(…). This works in bash, zsh and ksh and possibly other shells. For example:

$ sort <(printf "b\nc\na\n")
a
b
c
$ ls
foo
$ cp <(find . -name foo) bar
$ ls
bar  foo

SoHowever, forthis won't help in the example you citestate since pdftotext will save in a text file. While your best choice (apart from the obvious one of using -) is to use /dev/stdout as suggested by @TiCPU, you wouldcould also use another shell feature. The construct !:N refers to the Nth argument of the previous command. Therefore, you could do:

cat$ <(pdftotext "C BY BRIAN W KERNIGHAN & DENNIS M RITCHIE.pdf")  out.txt
$ cat !:2

If your shell supports them, the simplest way of doing such manipulations would be to use process substitution: <(…) and >(…). This works in bash, zsh and ksh and possibly other shells. For example:

$ sort <(printf "b\nc\na\n")
a
b
c
$ ls
foo
$ cp <(find . -name foo) bar
$ ls
bar  foo

So, for the example you cite, you would do:

cat <(pdftotext "C BY BRIAN W KERNIGHAN & DENNIS M RITCHIE.pdf")

If your shell supports them, the simplest way of doing such manipulations would be to use process substitution: <(…) and >(…). This works in bash, zsh and ksh and possibly other shells. For example:

$ sort <(printf "b\nc\na\n")
a
b
c
$ ls
foo
$ cp <(find . -name foo) bar
$ ls
bar  foo

However, this won't help in the example you state since pdftotext will save in a text file. While your best choice (apart from the obvious one of using -) is to use /dev/stdout as suggested by @TiCPU, you could also use another shell feature. The construct !:N refers to the Nth argument of the previous command. Therefore, you could do:

$ pdftotext "C BY BRIAN W KERNIGHAN & DENNIS M RITCHIE.pdf"  out.txt
$ cat !:2
1
source | link

If your shell supports them, the simplest way of doing such manipulations would be to use process substitution: <(…) and >(…). This works in bash, zsh and ksh and possibly other shells. For example:

$ sort <(printf "b\nc\na\n")
a
b
c
$ ls
foo
$ cp <(find . -name foo) bar
$ ls
bar  foo

So, for the example you cite, you would do:

cat <(pdftotext "C BY BRIAN W KERNIGHAN & DENNIS M RITCHIE.pdf")