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2 add comand that counts installed i386 packages
source | link

32-bit packages on 64-bit platform

First of all you need to allow your package manager to install packages with different architecture. But who is who? Apt is simple combination of wget and dpkg. The real package manager is dpkg, which provides low-level infrastructure for handling operations with real *.deb packages.

So, lets see available architectures for our particular case:

dpkg-architecture --list-known | grep -E "amd64|i386"

or

dpkg-architecture --list-known | ack "amd64|i386"

As you can see, in our case architectures are amd64 and i386. Now you can allow package manager to install i386 packages:

sudo dpkg --add-architecture i386

Now you can install your packages:

sudo aptitude update && sudo aptitude install python2.7:i386

Typically, first :386i386 package install results in installing a lot of dependency-packages. For example, on my Debian x86_64 GNU/Linux testing (stretch) installing skype (which depends on libc6:i386) results in installing 189 packages. :

dpkg --get-selections | ack i386 -c

The problem is that python2.7:i386 conflicts with python2.7 and a lot of packages depends on python2.7. So, you wont be able to install python2.7:i386 without removing all graphical environment.

Fix broken dependencies

This is simple one:

sudo apt-get install -f && sudo dpkg --configure -a

32-bit packages on 64-bit platform

First of all you need to allow your package manager to install packages with different architecture. But who is who? Apt is simple combination of wget and dpkg. The real package manager is dpkg, which provides low-level infrastructure for handling operations with real *.deb packages.

So, lets see available architectures for our particular case:

dpkg-architecture --list-known | grep -E "amd64|i386"

or

dpkg-architecture --list-known | ack "amd64|i386"

As you can see, in our case architectures are amd64 and i386. Now you can allow package manager to install i386 packages:

sudo dpkg --add-architecture i386

Now you can install your packages:

sudo aptitude update && sudo aptitude install python2.7:i386

Typically, first :386 package install results in installing a lot of dependency-packages. For example, on my Debian x86_64 GNU/Linux testing (stretch) installing skype (which depends on libc6:i386) results in installing 189 packages.

The problem is that python2.7:i386 conflicts with python2.7 and a lot of packages depends on python2.7. So, you wont be able to install python2.7:i386 without removing all graphical environment.

Fix broken dependencies

This is simple one:

sudo apt-get install -f && sudo dpkg --configure -a

32-bit packages on 64-bit platform

First of all you need to allow your package manager to install packages with different architecture. But who is who? Apt is simple combination of wget and dpkg. The real package manager is dpkg, which provides low-level infrastructure for handling operations with real *.deb packages.

So, lets see available architectures for our particular case:

dpkg-architecture --list-known | grep -E "amd64|i386"

or

dpkg-architecture --list-known | ack "amd64|i386"

As you can see, in our case architectures are amd64 and i386. Now you can allow package manager to install i386 packages:

sudo dpkg --add-architecture i386

Now you can install your packages:

sudo aptitude update && sudo aptitude install python2.7:i386

Typically, first i386 package install results in installing a lot of dependency-packages. For example, on my Debian x86_64 GNU/Linux testing (stretch) installing skype (which depends on libc6:i386) results in installing 189 packages:

dpkg --get-selections | ack i386 -c

The problem is that python2.7:i386 conflicts with python2.7 and a lot of packages depends on python2.7. So, you wont be able to install python2.7:i386 without removing all graphical environment.

Fix broken dependencies

This is simple one:

sudo apt-get install -f && sudo dpkg --configure -a
1
source | link

32-bit packages on 64-bit platform

First of all you need to allow your package manager to install packages with different architecture. But who is who? Apt is simple combination of wget and dpkg. The real package manager is dpkg, which provides low-level infrastructure for handling operations with real *.deb packages.

So, lets see available architectures for our particular case:

dpkg-architecture --list-known | grep -E "amd64|i386"

or

dpkg-architecture --list-known | ack "amd64|i386"

As you can see, in our case architectures are amd64 and i386. Now you can allow package manager to install i386 packages:

sudo dpkg --add-architecture i386

Now you can install your packages:

sudo aptitude update && sudo aptitude install python2.7:i386

Typically, first :386 package install results in installing a lot of dependency-packages. For example, on my Debian x86_64 GNU/Linux testing (stretch) installing skype (which depends on libc6:i386) results in installing 189 packages.

The problem is that python2.7:i386 conflicts with python2.7 and a lot of packages depends on python2.7. So, you wont be able to install python2.7:i386 without removing all graphical environment.

Fix broken dependencies

This is simple one:

sudo apt-get install -f && sudo dpkg --configure -a