8 added 24 characters in body
source | link
  • By default modprobe loads modules from subdirectories located in the /lib/modules/$(uname -r) directory. Usually all files have extension .ko, so you can list them with

    find /lib/modules/$(uname -r) -type f -name \*'*.koko'
    

    or, taking into account compressed files:

    find /lib/modules/$(uname -r) -type f -name '*.ko*'
    
  • However, to load a module successfully modprobe needs its dependencies listed in the file /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/modules.dep (and a corresponding binary version modules.dep.bin). If some module is present on the system, but is not on the list, then you should run a command depmod which will generate such dependencies and automatically include your module to modules.dep and modules.dep.bin.

  • Additionally, if the module is successfully loaded it will be listed in the file /proc/modules (also accessed via command lsmod).

  • By default modprobe loads modules from subdirectories located in the /lib/modules/$(uname -r). Usually all files have extension .ko, so you can list them with

    find /lib/modules/$(uname -r) -type f -name \*.ko
    
  • However, to load a module successfully modprobe needs its dependencies listed in the file /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/modules.dep (and a corresponding binary version modules.dep.bin). If some module is present on the system, but is not on the list, then you should run a command depmod which will generate such dependencies and include your module to modules.dep and modules.dep.bin.

  • Additionally, if the module is successfully loaded it will be listed in the file /proc/modules (also accessed via command lsmod).

  • By default modprobe loads modules from subdirectories located in the /lib/modules/$(uname -r) directory. Usually all files have extension .ko, so you can list them with

    find /lib/modules/$(uname -r) -type f -name '*.ko'
    

    or, taking into account compressed files:

    find /lib/modules/$(uname -r) -type f -name '*.ko*'
    
  • However, to load a module successfully modprobe needs its dependencies listed in the file /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/modules.dep (and a corresponding binary version modules.dep.bin). If some module is present on the system, but is not on the list, then you should run a command depmod which will generate such dependencies and automatically include your module to modules.dep and modules.dep.bin.

  • Additionally, if the module is successfully loaded it will be listed in the file /proc/modules (also accessed via command lsmod).

7 added 3 characters in body
source | link
  • By default modprobe loads modules from sub folderssubdirectories located in the /lib/modules/$(uname -r). Usually all files have extension .ko, so you can list them with

    find /lib/modules/$(uname -r) -type f -name \*.ko
    
  • However, to load a module successfully modprobe needs its dependencies listed in the file /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/modules.dep (and a corresponding binary version modules.dep.bin). If some module is present on the system, but is not on the list, then you should run a command depmod which will generate such dependencies and include your module to modules.dep and modules.dep.bin.

  • Additionally, if the module is successfully loaded it will be listed in the file /proc/modules (also accessed via command lsmod).

  • By default modprobe loads modules from sub folders located in the /lib/modules/$(uname -r). Usually all files have extension .ko, so you can list them with

    find /lib/modules/$(uname -r) -type f -name \*.ko
    
  • However, to load a module successfully modprobe needs its dependencies listed in the file /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/modules.dep (and a corresponding binary version modules.dep.bin). If some module is present on the system, but is not on the list, then you should run a command depmod which will include your module to modules.dep and modules.dep.bin.

  • Additionally, if the module is successfully loaded it will be listed in the file /proc/modules (also accessed via command lsmod).

  • By default modprobe loads modules from subdirectories located in the /lib/modules/$(uname -r). Usually all files have extension .ko, so you can list them with

    find /lib/modules/$(uname -r) -type f -name \*.ko
    
  • However, to load a module successfully modprobe needs its dependencies listed in the file /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/modules.dep (and a corresponding binary version modules.dep.bin). If some module is present on the system, but is not on the list, then you should run a command depmod which will generate such dependencies and include your module to modules.dep and modules.dep.bin.

  • Additionally, if the module is successfully loaded it will be listed in the file /proc/modules (also accessed via command lsmod).

6 added 19 characters in body
source | link

Normally modprobe loads modules from sub folders located in the /lib/modules/$(uname -r). Usually all files have extension .ko, so you can list them with

find /lib/modules/$(uname -r) -type f -name \*.ko

However to load a module successfully modprobe needs its dependencies listed in the file /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/modules.dep (and a corresponding binary version modules.dep.bin). If some module is present on the system, but is not on the list then you can run command depmod which will include your module to the modules.dep/modules.dep.bin.

Additionally, if the module is successfully loaded it will be listed in the file /proc/modules (also accessed via command lsmod).

  • By default modprobe loads modules from sub folders located in the /lib/modules/$(uname -r). Usually all files have extension .ko, so you can list them with

    find /lib/modules/$(uname -r) -type f -name \*.ko
    
  • However, to load a module successfully modprobe needs its dependencies listed in the file /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/modules.dep (and a corresponding binary version modules.dep.bin). If some module is present on the system, but is not on the list, then you should run a command depmod which will include your module to modules.dep and modules.dep.bin.

  • Additionally, if the module is successfully loaded it will be listed in the file /proc/modules (also accessed via command lsmod).

Normally modprobe loads modules from sub folders located in the /lib/modules/$(uname -r). Usually all files have extension .ko, so you can list them with

find /lib/modules/$(uname -r) -type f -name \*.ko

However to load a module successfully modprobe needs its dependencies listed in the file /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/modules.dep (and a corresponding binary version modules.dep.bin). If some module is present on the system, but is not on the list then you can run command depmod which will include your module to the modules.dep/modules.dep.bin.

Additionally, if the module is successfully loaded it will be listed in the file /proc/modules (also accessed via command lsmod).

  • By default modprobe loads modules from sub folders located in the /lib/modules/$(uname -r). Usually all files have extension .ko, so you can list them with

    find /lib/modules/$(uname -r) -type f -name \*.ko
    
  • However, to load a module successfully modprobe needs its dependencies listed in the file /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/modules.dep (and a corresponding binary version modules.dep.bin). If some module is present on the system, but is not on the list, then you should run a command depmod which will include your module to modules.dep and modules.dep.bin.

  • Additionally, if the module is successfully loaded it will be listed in the file /proc/modules (also accessed via command lsmod).

5 added 17 characters in body
source | link
4 added 140 characters in body
source | link
3 added command to actually list all modules
source | link
2 added 167 characters in body
source | link
1
source | link