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I understand what mounting is in Linux, and I understand device files. However I do not understand WHY we need to mount.

For example, as explained in the accepted answer of this questionaccepted answer of this question, using this command:

mount /dev/cdrom /media/cdrom

we are mounting the CDROM device to /media/cdrom and eventually are able to access the files of CDROM with the following command

ls /media/cdrom

which will list the content of the CDROM.

Why not skip mounting altogether, and do the following?

ls /dev/cdrom

And have the content of the CDROM Listed. I expect one of the answers to be: "This is how Linux is designed". But if so, then why was it designed that way? Why not access the /dev/cdrom directory directly? What's the real purpose of mounting?

I understand what mounting is in Linux, and I understand device files. However I do not understand WHY we need to mount.

For example, as explained in the accepted answer of this question, using this command:

mount /dev/cdrom /media/cdrom

we are mounting the CDROM device to /media/cdrom and eventually are able to access the files of CDROM with the following command

ls /media/cdrom

which will list the content of the CDROM.

Why not skip mounting altogether, and do the following?

ls /dev/cdrom

And have the content of the CDROM Listed. I expect one of the answers to be: "This is how Linux is designed". But if so, then why was it designed that way? Why not access the /dev/cdrom directory directly? What's the real purpose of mounting?

I understand what mounting is in Linux, and I understand device files. However I do not understand WHY we need to mount.

For example, as explained in the accepted answer of this question, using this command:

mount /dev/cdrom /media/cdrom

we are mounting the CDROM device to /media/cdrom and eventually are able to access the files of CDROM with the following command

ls /media/cdrom

which will list the content of the CDROM.

Why not skip mounting altogether, and do the following?

ls /dev/cdrom

And have the content of the CDROM Listed. I expect one of the answers to be: "This is how Linux is designed". But if so, then why was it designed that way? Why not access the /dev/cdrom directory directly? What's the real purpose of mounting?

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Why do we need to mount on Linux?

I am new to Linux so apologies about the easy question.

I understand what mounting is in Linux, and I understand device files. However I do not understand WHY we need to mount.

For example, as explained in the accepted answer of this question, using this command:

mount /dev/cdrom /media/cdrom

we are mounting the CDROM device to /media/cdrom and eventually are able to access the files of CDROM with the following command

ls /media/cdrom

which will list the content of the CDROM.

My question, whyWhy not skip mounting altogether, and do the following?

ls /dev/cdrom

andAnd have the content of the CDROM Listed. I expect one of the answers to be: "This is how Linux is designed". But if so, then why was it designed that way? Why not access the /dev/cdrom directory directly? WhatsWhat's the real purpose of mounting?

Why do we need to mount on Linux

I am new to Linux so apologies about the easy question.

I understand what mounting is in Linux, and I understand device files. However I do not understand WHY we need to mount.

For example, as explained in the accepted answer of this question, using this command:

mount /dev/cdrom /media/cdrom

we are mounting the CDROM device to /media/cdrom and eventually are able to access the files of CDROM with the following command

ls /media/cdrom

which will list the content of the CDROM.

My question, why not skip mounting altogether, and do the following

ls /dev/cdrom

and have the content of the CDROM Listed. I expect one of the answers to be: "This is how Linux is designed". But if so, then why was it designed that way? Why not access the /dev/cdrom directory directly? Whats the real purpose of mounting?

Why do we need to mount on Linux?

I understand what mounting is in Linux, and I understand device files. However I do not understand WHY we need to mount.

For example, as explained in the accepted answer of this question, using this command:

mount /dev/cdrom /media/cdrom

we are mounting the CDROM device to /media/cdrom and eventually are able to access the files of CDROM with the following command

ls /media/cdrom

which will list the content of the CDROM.

Why not skip mounting altogether, and do the following?

ls /dev/cdrom

And have the content of the CDROM Listed. I expect one of the answers to be: "This is how Linux is designed". But if so, then why was it designed that way? Why not access the /dev/cdrom directory directly? What's the real purpose of mounting?

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