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Yes and no (depending on what you mean by Linux)

There is a lot of confusion around the name Linux; It if often used to refer to two different things.

  • It the case of android, and some other cases. It refers to a Kernel named Linux. A small but essential part of an operating system. A kernel controls the hardware and provides services to the rest of the system. (see nice diagram answer of @Sachin Divekar).

  • In the case of almost all desktop systems it refers to X11+Gnu+Linux. See the diagram again, but remove all references to phone, telephony and android. Now change Application Framework to Gnu Tools, add a layer called X11, and another called Gnome or Kde etc. Then put application back on top. For servers there is usually no X11 or Kde/Gnome, as a graphical user interface is a waist of resources.

Android does not use X11 (though it can, but not to run android apps) or the Gnu Tool. However like Gnu+Linux some of the libraries are Gnu.

It is often difficult to knewknow which meaning someone has when they say Linux. This is why it is recommended to say “Gnu/Linux” when you mean Gnu+Linux, and “Linux kernel”, as you did, for the kernel. However don't say kernel, unless you know what one is (I have heard people add the word kernel in front of Linux (because they were told that is the correct term), bet they were using it to refer to Gnu+Linux.

There is a lot of confusion around the name Linux; It if often used to refer to two different things.

  • It the case of android, and some other cases. It refers to a Kernel named Linux. A small but essential part of an operating system. A kernel controls the hardware and provides services to the rest of the system. (see nice diagram answer of @Sachin Divekar).

  • In the case of almost all desktop systems it refers to X11+Gnu+Linux. See the diagram again, but remove all references to phone, telephony and android. Now change Application Framework to Gnu Tools, add a layer called X11, and another called Gnome or Kde etc. Then put application back on top. For servers there is usually no X11 or Kde/Gnome, as a graphical user interface is a waist of resources.

Android does not use X11 or the Gnu Tool. However like Gnu+Linux some of the libraries are Gnu.

It is often difficult to knew which meaning someone has when they say Linux. This is why it is recommended to say “Gnu/Linux” when you mean Gnu+Linux, and “Linux kernel”, as you did, for the kernel.

Yes and no (depending on what you mean by Linux)

There is a lot of confusion around the name Linux; It if often used to refer to two different things.

  • It the case of android, and some other cases. It refers to a Kernel named Linux. A small but essential part of an operating system. A kernel controls the hardware and provides services to the rest of the system. (see nice diagram answer of @Sachin Divekar).

  • In the case of almost all desktop systems it refers to X11+Gnu+Linux. See the diagram again, but remove all references to phone, telephony and android. Now change Application Framework to Gnu Tools, add a layer called X11, and another called Gnome or Kde etc. Then put application back on top. For servers there is usually no X11 or Kde/Gnome, as a graphical user interface is a waist of resources.

Android does not use X11 (though it can, but not to run android apps) or the Gnu Tool. However like Gnu+Linux some of the libraries are Gnu.

It is often difficult to know which meaning someone has when they say Linux. This is why it is recommended to say “Gnu/Linux” when you mean Gnu+Linux, and “Linux kernel”, as you did, for the kernel. However don't say kernel, unless you know what one is (I have heard people add the word kernel in front of Linux (because they were told that is the correct term), bet they were using it to refer to Gnu+Linux.

2 added 37 characters in body
source | link

There is a lot of confusion around the name Linux; It if often used to refer to two different things.

  • It the case of android, and some other cases. It refers to a Kernel named Linux. A small but essential part of an operating system. A kernel controls the hardware and provides services to the rest of the system. (see nice diagram answer of @Sachin Divekar).

  • In the case of almost all desktop systems it refers to X11+Gnu+Linux. See the diagram again, but remove all references to phone, telephony and android. Now change Application Framework to Gnu Tools, add a layer called X11, and another called Gnome or Kde etc. Then put application back on top. For servers there is usually no X11 or Kde/Gnome, as a graphical user interface is a waist of resources.

Android does not use X11 or the Gnu Tool. However like Gnu+Linux some of the libraries are Gnu.

It is often difficult to knew which meaning someone has when they say Linux. This is why it is recommended not to say Linux“Gnu/Linux” when you mean Gnu+Linux, and “Linux kernel”, as you did, for the kernel.

There is a lot of confusion around the name Linux; It if often used to refer to two different things.

  • It the case of android, and some other cases. It refers to a Kernel named Linux. A small but essential part of an operating system. A kernel controls the hardware and provides services to the rest of the system. (see nice diagram answer of @Sachin Divekar).

  • In the case of almost all desktop systems it refers to X11+Gnu+Linux. See the diagram again, but remove all references to phone, telephony and android. Now change Application Framework to Gnu Tools, add a layer called X11, and another called Gnome or Kde etc. Then put application back on top. For servers there is usually no X11 or Kde/Gnome, as a graphical user interface is a waist of resources.

Android does not use X11 or the Gnu Tool. However like Gnu+Linux some of the libraries are Gnu.

It is often difficult to knew which meaning someone has when they say Linux. This is why it is recommended not to say Linux when you mean Gnu+Linux.

There is a lot of confusion around the name Linux; It if often used to refer to two different things.

  • It the case of android, and some other cases. It refers to a Kernel named Linux. A small but essential part of an operating system. A kernel controls the hardware and provides services to the rest of the system. (see nice diagram answer of @Sachin Divekar).

  • In the case of almost all desktop systems it refers to X11+Gnu+Linux. See the diagram again, but remove all references to phone, telephony and android. Now change Application Framework to Gnu Tools, add a layer called X11, and another called Gnome or Kde etc. Then put application back on top. For servers there is usually no X11 or Kde/Gnome, as a graphical user interface is a waist of resources.

Android does not use X11 or the Gnu Tool. However like Gnu+Linux some of the libraries are Gnu.

It is often difficult to knew which meaning someone has when they say Linux. This is why it is recommended to say “Gnu/Linux” when you mean Gnu+Linux, and “Linux kernel”, as you did, for the kernel.

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source | link

There is a lot of confusion around the name Linux; It if often used to refer to two different things.

  • It the case of android, and some other cases. It refers to a Kernel named Linux. A small but essential part of an operating system. A kernel controls the hardware and provides services to the rest of the system. (see nice diagram answer of @Sachin Divekar).

  • In the case of almost all desktop systems it refers to X11+Gnu+Linux. See the diagram again, but remove all references to phone, telephony and android. Now change Application Framework to Gnu Tools, add a layer called X11, and another called Gnome or Kde etc. Then put application back on top. For servers there is usually no X11 or Kde/Gnome, as a graphical user interface is a waist of resources.

Android does not use X11 or the Gnu Tool. However like Gnu+Linux some of the libraries are Gnu.

It is often difficult to knew which meaning someone has when they say Linux. This is why it is recommended not to say Linux when you mean Gnu+Linux.