2 replaced http://unix.stackexchange.com/ with https://unix.stackexchange.com/
source | link

There are several gradations, since you can run a 32-bit or mixed operating system on a 64-bit-capable CPU. See http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/134391/64-bit-kernel-but-all-32-bit-elf-executable-running-processes-how-is-this/134394#13439464-bit kernel, but all 32-bit ELF executable running processes, how is this? for a detailed discussion (written for x86, but most of it applies to arm as well).

You can find the processor model in /proc/cpuinfo. For example:

$ cat /proc/cpuinfo
Processor       : ARMv7 Processor rev 10 (v7l)

ARMv7 (and below) is 32-bit. ARMv8 introduces the 64-bit instruction set.

If you want to see whether your system supports 64-bit binaries, check the kernel architecture:

$ uname -m
armv7l

On a 64-bit processor, you'd see armv8 (or above).


Right now, if you were running a 64-bit ARM, you'd know.

There are several gradations, since you can run a 32-bit or mixed operating system on a 64-bit-capable CPU. See http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/134391/64-bit-kernel-but-all-32-bit-elf-executable-running-processes-how-is-this/134394#134394 for a detailed discussion (written for x86, but most of it applies to arm as well).

You can find the processor model in /proc/cpuinfo. For example:

$ cat /proc/cpuinfo
Processor       : ARMv7 Processor rev 10 (v7l)

ARMv7 (and below) is 32-bit. ARMv8 introduces the 64-bit instruction set.

If you want to see whether your system supports 64-bit binaries, check the kernel architecture:

$ uname -m
armv7l

On a 64-bit processor, you'd see armv8 (or above).


Right now, if you were running a 64-bit ARM, you'd know.

There are several gradations, since you can run a 32-bit or mixed operating system on a 64-bit-capable CPU. See 64-bit kernel, but all 32-bit ELF executable running processes, how is this? for a detailed discussion (written for x86, but most of it applies to arm as well).

You can find the processor model in /proc/cpuinfo. For example:

$ cat /proc/cpuinfo
Processor       : ARMv7 Processor rev 10 (v7l)

ARMv7 (and below) is 32-bit. ARMv8 introduces the 64-bit instruction set.

If you want to see whether your system supports 64-bit binaries, check the kernel architecture:

$ uname -m
armv7l

On a 64-bit processor, you'd see armv8 (or above).


Right now, if you were running a 64-bit ARM, you'd know.

1
source | link

There are several gradations, since you can run a 32-bit or mixed operating system on a 64-bit-capable CPU. See http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/134391/64-bit-kernel-but-all-32-bit-elf-executable-running-processes-how-is-this/134394#134394 for a detailed discussion (written for x86, but most of it applies to arm as well).

You can find the processor model in /proc/cpuinfo. For example:

$ cat /proc/cpuinfo
Processor       : ARMv7 Processor rev 10 (v7l)

ARMv7 (and below) is 32-bit. ARMv8 introduces the 64-bit instruction set.

If you want to see whether your system supports 64-bit binaries, check the kernel architecture:

$ uname -m
armv7l

On a 64-bit processor, you'd see armv8 (or above).


Right now, if you were running a 64-bit ARM, you'd know.