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The easy way: backports

I assume you need the new kernel to get your modem to work. If you can live with 3.12 instead of 3.13, at least for now, then instead of recompiling the kernel from source, you can just use Debian Backports. [update: Now backports is up to 3.14]

You can manually grab the package from packages.debian.org (update: now 3.14) on a computer with an Internet connection. Also grab initramfs-tools (there will be a link on the page). Put both on a USB stick, and install with dpkg -i.

You can also look at the linux-image-amd64 package, or the similar one for your architecture, to find out the most-recent version.

Once you have an Internet connection on the computer, the backports webpage has full instructions on how to set it up so you get updates, but in short:

  1. Edit /etc/apt/sources.list and add deb http://YOURMIRROR.debian.org/debian wheezy-backports main
  2. To install a package from backports, use -t wheezy-backports, e.g., aptitude -t wheezy-backports install linux-image-amd64

The hard way: upstream kernel sources

Note that you'll lose Debian patches this way, unless you hand-apply them.

Configure the kernel as in http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/115620/configuring-compiling-and-installing-a-linux-kernelConfiguring, compiling and installing a custom Linux kernel but do not install it. (You could also swipe the Debian configuration file, but beware it builds almost everything, so will take a very long time to compile). Instead, run make deb-pkg. This will generate several Debian packages. You'll want to install the linux-image- and possibly linux-headers- and linux-firmware-image- ones. You don't need to install the (absolutely huge) linux-image-*-dbg package.

The easy way: backports

I assume you need the new kernel to get your modem to work. If you can live with 3.12 instead of 3.13, at least for now, then instead of recompiling the kernel from source, you can just use Debian Backports. [update: Now backports is up to 3.14]

You can manually grab the package from packages.debian.org (update: now 3.14) on a computer with an Internet connection. Also grab initramfs-tools (there will be a link on the page). Put both on a USB stick, and install with dpkg -i.

You can also look at the linux-image-amd64 package, or the similar one for your architecture, to find out the most-recent version.

Once you have an Internet connection on the computer, the backports webpage has full instructions on how to set it up so you get updates, but in short:

  1. Edit /etc/apt/sources.list and add deb http://YOURMIRROR.debian.org/debian wheezy-backports main
  2. To install a package from backports, use -t wheezy-backports, e.g., aptitude -t wheezy-backports install linux-image-amd64

The hard way: upstream kernel sources

Note that you'll lose Debian patches this way, unless you hand-apply them.

Configure the kernel as in http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/115620/configuring-compiling-and-installing-a-linux-kernel but do not install it. (You could also swipe the Debian configuration file, but beware it builds almost everything, so will take a very long time to compile). Instead, run make deb-pkg. This will generate several Debian packages. You'll want to install the linux-image- and possibly linux-headers- and linux-firmware-image- ones. You don't need to install the (absolutely huge) linux-image-*-dbg package.

The easy way: backports

I assume you need the new kernel to get your modem to work. If you can live with 3.12 instead of 3.13, at least for now, then instead of recompiling the kernel from source, you can just use Debian Backports. [update: Now backports is up to 3.14]

You can manually grab the package from packages.debian.org (update: now 3.14) on a computer with an Internet connection. Also grab initramfs-tools (there will be a link on the page). Put both on a USB stick, and install with dpkg -i.

You can also look at the linux-image-amd64 package, or the similar one for your architecture, to find out the most-recent version.

Once you have an Internet connection on the computer, the backports webpage has full instructions on how to set it up so you get updates, but in short:

  1. Edit /etc/apt/sources.list and add deb http://YOURMIRROR.debian.org/debian wheezy-backports main
  2. To install a package from backports, use -t wheezy-backports, e.g., aptitude -t wheezy-backports install linux-image-amd64

The hard way: upstream kernel sources

Note that you'll lose Debian patches this way, unless you hand-apply them.

Configure the kernel as in Configuring, compiling and installing a custom Linux kernel but do not install it. (You could also swipe the Debian configuration file, but beware it builds almost everything, so will take a very long time to compile). Instead, run make deb-pkg. This will generate several Debian packages. You'll want to install the linux-image- and possibly linux-headers- and linux-firmware-image- ones. You don't need to install the (absolutely huge) linux-image-*-dbg package.

3 update for new kernel in backports.
source | link

The easy way: backports

I assume you need the new kernel to get your modem to work. If you can live with 3.12 instead of 3.13, at least for now, then instead of recompiling the kernel from source, you can just use Debian Backports. [update: Now backports is up to 3.14]

You can manually grab the package from packages.debian.orgpackages.debian.org (update: now 3.14) on a computer with an Internet connection. Also grab initramfs-tools (there will be a link on the page). Put both on a USB stick, and install with dpkg -i.

You can also look at the linux-image-amd64 package, or the similar one for your architecture, to find out the most-recent version.

Once you have an Internet connection on the computer, the backports webpage has full instructions on how to set it up so you get updates, but in short:

  1. Edit /etc/apt/sources.list and add deb http://YOURMIRROR.debian.org/debian wheezy-backports main
  2. To install a package from backports, use -t wheezy-backports, e.g., aptitude -t wheezy-backports install linux-image-amd64

The hard way: upstream kernel sources

Note that you'll lose Debian patches this way, unless you hand-apply them.

Configure the kernel as in http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/115620/configuring-compiling-and-installing-a-linux-kernel but do not install it. (You could also swipe the Debian configuration file, but beware it builds almost everything, so will take a very long time to compile). Instead, run make deb-pkg. This will generate several Debian packages. You'll want to install the linux-image- and possibly linux-headers- and linux-firmware-image- ones. You don't need to install the (absolutely huge) linux-image-*-dbg package.

The easy way: backports

I assume you need the new kernel to get your modem to work. If you can live with 3.12 instead of 3.13, at least for now, then instead of recompiling the kernel from source, you can just use Debian Backports.

You can manually grab the package from packages.debian.org on a computer with an Internet connection. Also grab initramfs-tools (there will be a link on the page). Put both on a USB stick, and install with dpkg -i.

Once you have an Internet connection on the computer, the backports webpage has full instructions on how to set it up so you get updates, but in short:

  1. Edit /etc/apt/sources.list and add deb http://YOURMIRROR.debian.org/debian wheezy-backports main
  2. To install a package from backports, use -t wheezy-backports, e.g., aptitude -t wheezy-backports install linux-image-amd64

The hard way: upstream kernel sources

Note that you'll lose Debian patches this way, unless you hand-apply them.

Configure the kernel as in http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/115620/configuring-compiling-and-installing-a-linux-kernel but do not install it. (You could also swipe the Debian configuration file, but beware it builds almost everything, so will take a very long time to compile). Instead, run make deb-pkg. This will generate several Debian packages. You'll want to install the linux-image- and possibly linux-headers- and linux-firmware-image- ones. You don't need to install the (absolutely huge) linux-image-*-dbg package.

The easy way: backports

I assume you need the new kernel to get your modem to work. If you can live with 3.12 instead of 3.13, at least for now, then instead of recompiling the kernel from source, you can just use Debian Backports. [update: Now backports is up to 3.14]

You can manually grab the package from packages.debian.org (update: now 3.14) on a computer with an Internet connection. Also grab initramfs-tools (there will be a link on the page). Put both on a USB stick, and install with dpkg -i.

You can also look at the linux-image-amd64 package, or the similar one for your architecture, to find out the most-recent version.

Once you have an Internet connection on the computer, the backports webpage has full instructions on how to set it up so you get updates, but in short:

  1. Edit /etc/apt/sources.list and add deb http://YOURMIRROR.debian.org/debian wheezy-backports main
  2. To install a package from backports, use -t wheezy-backports, e.g., aptitude -t wheezy-backports install linux-image-amd64

The hard way: upstream kernel sources

Note that you'll lose Debian patches this way, unless you hand-apply them.

Configure the kernel as in http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/115620/configuring-compiling-and-installing-a-linux-kernel but do not install it. (You could also swipe the Debian configuration file, but beware it builds almost everything, so will take a very long time to compile). Instead, run make deb-pkg. This will generate several Debian packages. You'll want to install the linux-image- and possibly linux-headers- and linux-firmware-image- ones. You don't need to install the (absolutely huge) linux-image-*-dbg package.

2 add in how to build from upstream sources.
source | link

The easy way: backports

I assume you need the new kernel to get your modem to work. If you can live with 3.12 instead of 3.13, at least for now, then instead of recompiling the kernel from source, you can just use Debian Backports.

You can manually grab the package from packages.debian.org on a computer with an Internet connection. Also grab initramfs-tools (there will be a link on the page). Put both on a USB stick, and install with dpkg -i.

Once you have an Internet connection on the computer, the backports webpage has full instructions on how to set it up so you get updates, but in short:

  1. Edit /etc/apt/sources.list and add deb http://YOURMIRROR.debian.org/debian wheezy-backports main
  2. To install a package from backports, use -t wheezy-backports, e.g., aptitude -t wheezy-backports install linux-image-amd64

The hard way: upstream kernel sources

Note that you'll lose Debian patches this way, unless you hand-apply them.

Configure the kernel as in http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/115620/configuring-compiling-and-installing-a-linux-kernel but do not install it. (You could also swipe the Debian configuration file, but beware it builds almost everything, so will take a very long time to compile). Instead, run make deb-pkg. This will generate several Debian packages. You'll want to install the linux-image- and possibly linux-headers- and linux-firmware-image- ones. You don't need to install the (absolutely huge) linux-image-*-dbg package.

I assume you need the new kernel to get your modem to work. If you can live with 3.12 instead of 3.13, at least for now, then instead of recompiling the kernel from source, you can just use Debian Backports.

You can manually grab the package from packages.debian.org on a computer with an Internet connection. Also grab initramfs-tools (there will be a link on the page). Put both on a USB stick, and install with dpkg -i.

Once you have an Internet connection on the computer, the backports webpage has full instructions on how to set it up so you get updates, but in short:

  1. Edit /etc/apt/sources.list and add deb http://YOURMIRROR.debian.org/debian wheezy-backports main
  2. To install a package from backports, use -t wheezy-backports, e.g., aptitude -t wheezy-backports install linux-image-amd64

The easy way: backports

I assume you need the new kernel to get your modem to work. If you can live with 3.12 instead of 3.13, at least for now, then instead of recompiling the kernel from source, you can just use Debian Backports.

You can manually grab the package from packages.debian.org on a computer with an Internet connection. Also grab initramfs-tools (there will be a link on the page). Put both on a USB stick, and install with dpkg -i.

Once you have an Internet connection on the computer, the backports webpage has full instructions on how to set it up so you get updates, but in short:

  1. Edit /etc/apt/sources.list and add deb http://YOURMIRROR.debian.org/debian wheezy-backports main
  2. To install a package from backports, use -t wheezy-backports, e.g., aptitude -t wheezy-backports install linux-image-amd64

The hard way: upstream kernel sources

Note that you'll lose Debian patches this way, unless you hand-apply them.

Configure the kernel as in http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/115620/configuring-compiling-and-installing-a-linux-kernel but do not install it. (You could also swipe the Debian configuration file, but beware it builds almost everything, so will take a very long time to compile). Instead, run make deb-pkg. This will generate several Debian packages. You'll want to install the linux-image- and possibly linux-headers- and linux-firmware-image- ones. You don't need to install the (absolutely huge) linux-image-*-dbg package.

1
source | link