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Is there a way to determine which init system is being used in Linux? (such as sysvinit, upstart, systemd, etc.) I don't care if it can be programmatically determined, I just want to know how I can figure it out.

I'm aware of Bash- detect init systemBash- detect init system, but that is about detecting the init system from bash in order to write a cross-init-system daemon. The answers from it do not provide a clear way to determine this because they are targeting specifically a programmatic solution which I am not interested in.

Is there a way to determine which init system is being used in Linux? (such as sysvinit, upstart, systemd, etc.) I don't care if it can be programmatically determined, I just want to know how I can figure it out.

I'm aware of Bash- detect init system, but that is about detecting the init system from bash in order to write a cross-init-system daemon. The answers from it do not provide a clear way to determine this because they are targeting specifically a programmatic solution which I am not interested in.

Is there a way to determine which init system is being used in Linux? (such as sysvinit, upstart, systemd, etc.) I don't care if it can be programmatically determined, I just want to know how I can figure it out.

I'm aware of Bash- detect init system, but that is about detecting the init system from bash in order to write a cross-init-system daemon. The answers from it do not provide a clear way to determine this because they are targeting specifically a programmatic solution which I am not interested in.

    Post Merged (source) to unix.stackexchange.com/questions/18209/bash-detect-init-system
    Post Locked by Michael Mrozek
    Post Closed as "duplicate" by jasonwryan, Anthon, Timo, Zelda, rahmu of
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Is there a reliable way to determine which init system is being used in Linux? (such as sysvinit, upstart, systemd, etc.) I don't necessarily care if it can be programmatically determined, I just want to know how I can figure it out.

I'm aware of Bash- detect init system, but that is about detecting the init system from bash in order to write a cross-init-system daemon. The answers from it do not provide a clear way to determine this because they are targeting specifically a programmatic solution which I am not interested in.

Is there a reliable way to determine which init system is being used in Linux? (such as sysvinit, upstart, systemd, etc.) I don't necessarily care if it can be programmatically determined, I just want to know how I can figure it out.

Is there a way to determine which init system is being used in Linux? (such as sysvinit, upstart, systemd, etc.) I don't care if it can be programmatically determined, I just want to know how I can figure it out.

I'm aware of Bash- detect init system, but that is about detecting the init system from bash in order to write a cross-init-system daemon. The answers from it do not provide a clear way to determine this because they are targeting specifically a programmatic solution which I am not interested in.

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How to determine which init system is used?

Is there a reliable way to determine which init system is being used in Linux? (such as sysvinit, upstart, systemd, etc.) I don't necessarily care if it can be programmatically determined, I just want to know how I can figure it out.