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visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen Mar 20 at 22:38

Oct
27
comment Not able to install internet explorer!
Consider Microsoft's official virtual machines with Windows + IE
Oct
27
comment Does a high “used” value for a device in “btrfs filesystem show” pose a problem? Should a balance operation be performed?
With btrfs, don't trust the "regular" df. Just don't use it. See FAQ: Why are there so many ways to check the amount of free space?
Oct
24
comment Is CentOS exactly the same as RHEL?
Indeed, CentOS's FAQ states they don't: "Does CentOS change the upstream Source RPMs? No."
Oct
6
comment Resize an extended partition to the whole drive
Note that some filesystems (btrfs, zfs) allow for adding devices to a filesystem: if you can not extend the partition, you may create a new one and add it as a second device.
Oct
6
comment Resize an extended partition to the whole drive
If you follow frostshutz's idea: after having resized the partition, you might want to resize the filesystem (via resize2fs or analogous program) to extend it over the new area of the partition.
Oct
6
comment Resize an extended partition to the whole drive
What is the exact text of the error message about the partition geometry?
Sep
14
comment How can I monitor disk io?
/sys/block/sda/stat is documented at https://www.kernel.org/doc/Documentation/block/stat.txt
Jun
30
comment How to prevent Windows partition to access(read) Linux partition files?
Or: have the partitions permanently deleted, and pass the offset (-o offset) to mount in the initrd.
Jun
24
comment Should a laptop user switch from ext4 to btrfs?
You found corrupted data twice and still believe the SMART response??
Jun
17
comment How can I solve the issue about mounting my Windows 8 NTFS partition on Linux Mint?
When you write to a filesystem, part of the data is kept in RAM, for quick access. It is sent to the disk later. When an OS is hibernated, that data is put in the hibernation data: if you access the filesystem with another OS, you see a state that may not represent what the first OS has virtually done on the disk. It's a bad habit on NTFS and other journaled filesystems, and even more dangerous on FAT and other non-journaled ones. That's why you are not allowed to write - when the first OS resumes, it will expect the original f.s. state and assume the changes buffered in RAM still apply.
Jun
1
comment Is it good to make a separate partition for /boot?
Are you implying that it was it 5 seconds slower in your experience?
May
30
comment Is it good to make a separate partition for /boot?
It's hard for me to believe that journaling and checksumming make boot noticeably slower. Do you have hard numbers?
May
4
comment Rearrange partitions to install a second Linux distribution
I add (manually) a menu entry in GRUB, to boot it. How: grub: boot from ISO
May
4
comment Rearrange partitions to install a second Linux distribution
I usually save a live (recovery) CD in /boot, so I usually make it 1 GB or a bit more.
May
2
comment Partitioning. Arch vs Ubuntu manuals
@RedPlanet I'll vote up for you
May
2
comment How do I name a partition?
Yeah, technically, you are right because you're writing about a partition label, but a filesystem can be labelled too. That's why parted returns error - it does not deal with the filesystem. But this point is moot, since nobody is going to use a partition without a filesystem inside.
May
2
comment How do I name a partition?
On MBR, labels are stored inside the filesystem, provided that the filesystem supports a label. You can use filesystem-specific tools, like e2label, or Gparted, that runs them for you. Gparted Manual, Setting a partition label // Gparted Features Support table which you can also see via the "View" >> "File system support" menu.
May
2
comment How do I name a partition?
You can edit labels in Gparted, and see them with blkid
May
2
comment How do I name a partition?
No, it's valid for both
May
1
comment How do I name a partition?
... or GParted. The "name" of the partition is called the label.