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Jun
18
comment Make all new files in a directory accessible to a group
Q2: I understand that the commands can be run in either order. But was I correct about the ordering w.r.t what they do? (Thanks for the clarification.)
Jun
18
comment Make all new files in a directory accessible to a group
Q2. You said, "Now that the one-time setup is over, change the directory's ACL to give the group write permissions and to make these permissions inherited by newly created files." But you've got the order of the commands wrong, haven't you? i.e. the one with the -d option should come next as it's the command that sets permissions for the newly created files. Right?
Jun
18
comment Make all new files in a directory accessible to a group
Q1. Are you sure you should add acl as an option in mount command when you have it added in /etc/fstab? I think it's redundant and especially because when you run the mount command in your answer (i.e. mount -o remount,acl /), you'll get an output like this: /dev/vda1 on / type ext4 (rw,errors=remount-ro,acl,acl) (see acl,acl in the end). Is that okay? Please correct it if I am not wrong.
Jun
18
accepted Why does fstab use UUID instead of the actual file system name?
Jun
18
revised Why does fstab use UUID instead of the actual file system name?
added 162 characters in body
Jun
18
revised Why does fstab use UUID instead of the actual file system name?
added 244 characters in body
Jun
18
revised Why does fstab use UUID instead of the actual file system name?
edited title
Jun
18
comment Why does fstab use UUID instead of the actual file system name?
@liquidat (1) The machine is rebooting just fine. (2) I shut the VM down a couple of times to take a snapshot. Could that be it? (3) That's the only uncommented line in /etc/fstab.
Jun
18
comment Why does fstab use UUID instead of the actual file system name?
@liquidat This is the output I got: lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 9 Jun 18 11:04 6f469437-4935-44c5-8ac6-53eb54a9af26 -> ../../vda. As for your other question, I'll contact the web host about that.
Jun
18
revised Why does fstab use UUID instead of the actual file system name?
added 108 characters in body
Jun
18
comment Why does fstab use UUID instead of the actual file system name?
Okay. So what explains the different UUIDs for /dev/vda in /etc/fstab and reported by blkid? (Please see the updated question if you haven't.)
Jun
18
comment Why does fstab use UUID instead of the actual file system name?
In that case, the problem (as updated in my question) is that I get two different UUIDs for /dev/vda! Please see the question one more time.
Jun
18
comment Why does fstab use UUID instead of the actual file system name?
@AvinashRaj Hmm, weirdly, the sudo blkid command outputs a different UUID for /dev/vda. This adds to my confusion. :) (Updated question.)
Jun
18
revised Why does fstab use UUID instead of the actual file system name?
added 51 characters in body
Jun
18
asked Why does fstab use UUID instead of the actual file system name?