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visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen Mar 1 at 22:32

Feb
12
comment Cannot connect to ethernet on a cable modem
Thank you, @Patrick!
Feb
12
accepted Cannot connect to ethernet on a cable modem
Feb
12
answered Cannot connect to ethernet on a cable modem
Feb
6
comment Cannot connect to ethernet on a cable modem
OK, thank you! Although I don't have any more laptops, modems or cables :( I'll see what I can do...
Feb
6
comment Cannot connect to ethernet on a cable modem
Thanks a lot for your answer! Could it be a modem configuration problem? I reset it yesterday, but the default settings could have some problems, I think... I could configure it through the Wifi.
Feb
6
asked Cannot connect to ethernet on a cable modem
Dec
11
comment Why do some open-source Linux software packages costs?
You are confusing free software with freeware. Free software refers to freedom, while freeware to the price. Read gnu.org/philosophy/open-source-misses-the-point.html and gnu.org/philosophy/selling.html
Dec
4
comment Installed library packages cannot be found on OpenWRT
OK, I can't see anything wrong with it. Do not run ln -s libc.so.0 /lib/libc.so.6.
Dec
4
comment Installed library packages cannot be found on OpenWRT
What is the output of ls -l /lib/libc.so.6?
Dec
4
comment Installed library packages cannot be found on OpenWRT
Looks similar, but the problem could also be that OpenWRT uses uClibc, a minimal implementation of libc, instead of glibc, which is found in Ubuntu, for example. Well, I don't really know that much about libc, like if the different implementations are compatible, etc. It seems the compilation went through without linking the libraries, which leaves me confused as well... Based on the link above, try running ln -s libc.so.0 /lib/libc.so.6 (assuming libc.so.0 is located under /lib).
Dec
3
comment Installed library packages cannot be found on OpenWRT
I see OpenWRT uses uClibc. Try running opkg list libc* to see a list of available packages related to libc6. If there's something named like libc6-dev, install it like opkg install libc6-dev. I'm talking based on the documentation for opkg, which is here: wiki.openwrt.org/doc/techref/opkg
Dec
3
comment Installed library packages cannot be found on OpenWRT
Then it seems your libc.provides didn't really solve the problem... libc is very essential on Linux, and that must be the culprit of the problem.
Dec
3
comment Installed library packages cannot be found on OpenWRT
The problem is not with $PATH, although blue generally means symlinks and green executables (ls must be linked to busybox). Have you tried running /bin/amld? I don't know if it will work, though.
Dec
3
comment Installed library packages cannot be found on OpenWRT
From your ls output colours, I bet the ones in blue are symlinks to binaries in another directory, and /bin is not included in $PATH. What is the output of echo $PATH?
Dec
2
comment Run my own HTTP fast-browsing proxy a la Opera Mini?
@goldilocks Yes, it comes at a cost - Opera recompresses images as WEBP. It really isn't very noticeable, though, unless you are viewing some high resolution pictures as in photo-sharing websites, like you mentioned. Opera also offers a "reload image in original quality" right-click option, which the OP won't be able to replicate. Also, for people with high-speed Internet access, it will just increase the latency.
Dec
2
comment Run my own HTTP fast-browsing proxy a la Opera Mini?
@goldilocks I have an instance of Opera 12 open for about 10 hours. Upon clicking its icon it tells me I saved 1,2 GB on this session, which is 50% of all HTTP traffic. On my limited 3G plan the difference is really noticeable, mainly in websites full of images, of course.
Dec
2
answered Run my own HTTP fast-browsing proxy a la Opera Mini?
Nov
28
comment What does the expression $(<“dir/file”) mean in bash?
@skwllsp You can turn that into an answer.
Nov
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
26
comment How to tell Linux Kernel > 3.0 to completely ignore a failing disk?
Sorry if this is too obvious, but since you have not included in your question: have you made sure the device name or UUID is not listed in /etc/fstab? Because the delay on boot could be caused earlier by the kernel or udev, which seems to be the case, but also later by fsck, when reading fstab.