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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 36 votes cast
Sep
18
comment How can I find the number of files on a filesystem?
I think this is what I'm looking for. Is there any way to find out how many of each type of file there is? This isn't directly needed by my application, but could be useful knowledge.
Sep
17
asked How can I find the number of files on a filesystem?
Sep
10
revised View stdout/stderr of systemd service
Added man page content
Sep
10
comment View stdout/stderr of systemd service
@sbtkd85 - Well, I don't have /var/log/syslog, but /var/log/messages does the trick. The problem is, according to the logs, my daemon crashes on start, yet I can tell that it is still running because it has an HTTP server, and I can query it. It seems the rest of the logs are getting lost...
Sep
9
comment Adjusting Screen Size on Ubuntu Virtualbox
Do you find @Anton's answer insufficient? If so, please comment on what else you're looking for. If it solved your problem, please accept it as an answer.
Sep
9
asked View stdout/stderr of systemd service
Aug
10
comment Efficiency of lots of inotify watches or stat calls
@Gilles- Thanks. I assumed it would be a FUSE-based fs. I'll probably end up needing more features than it has, and it looks a little too young, but definitely an interesting read.
Aug
10
accepted Detect init system using the shell
Aug
10
comment Efficiency of lots of inotify watches or stat calls
I would be very interested. The only thing I can think of is an NFS filesystem, which isn't exactly what I'm looking for.
Aug
9
accepted Efficiency of lots of inotify watches or stat calls
Aug
9
comment Efficiency of lots of inotify watches or stat calls
So, is there any gain to adding a listener to individual files?
Aug
9
asked Efficiency of lots of inotify watches or stat calls
Aug
7
comment Detect init system using the shell
@Caleb- Yeah, I already have that logic in there, but good catch. I was hoping for a way to sniff the init system to use an intelligent guess than a sane default.
Aug
7
comment Detect init system using the shell
Hmph, so it's looking like I can't have a 'one script to rule them all' solution. I've seen a lot of programs that use autoconf or similar to handle cross-platform stuff, but it doesn't seem like it's the right tool for my application. Is maintaining versions for each platform really the only reliable solution?
Aug
7
comment Detect init system using the shell
Cool, thanks for all your help. You definitely have pointed me in the right direction.
Aug
7
comment Detect init system using the shell
So, are you saying that there is no reliable way to detect the init system programmatically? Having the user pass in parameters is certainly safer, but if the user does not pass anything in, what would be the best way to guess?
Aug
7
comment Detect init system using the shell
What do you mean by "look at the init scripts type"? Often different init systems put their scripts/files somewhere besides /etc/init, like systemd puts them in /etc/systemd. If I was to have my script grok these, it could take a little while. Oh, and thanks for the link BTW for portable shell programming.
Aug
6
asked Detect init system using the shell
Jul
10
comment Kernel inotify watch limit reached
@ultrasawblade- inotify replaced dnotify. dnotify was slow and buggy. inotify can be used on directories, and a directory will be "changed" when one of the files in that directory (one level deep) is modified. Directories are just files anyway.
Jul
9
accepted Automated PAM module installation