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visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen May 27 at 8:30

May
27
awarded  Supporter
Jun
19
comment Empathy integration with Gnome3 failed
Oh, Thanks! I didn't know that! but I've used Gnome 3 in the laptop before and just want the PC to behave the same way, that is, notifying me when somebody talks to me.
Jun
18
asked Empathy integration with Gnome3 failed
Apr
20
comment How to determine whether a linux filesystem belongs to a running system or not
Hi!! I've tested it and actually works!! thank you so much!! I was wrongly looking for some file or directory that could give me that information, but I didn't think of using stat functions. This is the best solution.
Apr
20
awarded  Scholar
Apr
20
accepted How to determine whether a linux filesystem belongs to a running system or not
Jan
14
comment How to determine whether a linux filesystem belongs to a running system or not
@Scott the first option, "the filesystem is the root of the current system –– the one that your program is running on"
Jan
14
comment How to determine whether a linux filesystem belongs to a running system or not
Thanks! but what I need to know isn't only whether the filesystem is mounted, but also whether it's a root directory and is running right now (powered on). My mistake! I've edited the question...
Jan
14
comment How to determine whether a linux filesystem belongs to a running system or not
@Scott done. Thanks!
Jan
14
awarded  Editor
Jan
14
revised How to determine whether a linux filesystem belongs to a running system or not
added 82 characters in body
Jan
13
comment How to determine whether a linux filesystem belongs to a running system or not
@htor & @AlexandreAlves, I've chosen the wrong words, what I meant with "up/down" were not "mounted/unmounted", but whether is the filesystem contains the root of a running system instead. For example, you can have two disks with a linux inside each one in the same computer, for example one with ubuntu and the other with debian; but it only can be running one at once. If you look inside the /proc/ folder it will be more or less populated depending on if it's running right now or not. That's what I meant.
Jan
12
awarded  Student
Jan
12
asked How to determine whether a linux filesystem belongs to a running system or not