3,549 reputation
31437
bio website lekensteyn.nl
location Netherlands
age 21
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Sep 14 at 21:18

Former Kubuntu desktop user, now using Arch Linux. Open-source enthusiast, programmer.

Interests: network protocols, Linux kernel, server administration, Android, breaking & fixing stuff.


Mar
25
comment USB keypad (HID) not responding in linux but in grub
Let me know if you still have any questions, and if possible, post a USB capture to cloudshark.org
Mar
25
answered USB keypad (HID) not responding in linux but in grub
Mar
7
comment Compare two text files and find matching lines
Correct, patt.txt would be your "file A". bigDNA.txt is "file B".
Mar
7
comment Compare two text files and find matching lines
@Alejandro It doesn't matter if it changes periodically, the second command can handle that. If you need to do some pre-processing, that is still possible. E.g. to print the last word if a line matches FOO, you would use a subcommand like $(awk '/FOO/{print $NF}/' patt.txt | sed 's#$#|#' | tr ...
Mar
7
revised Compare two text files and find matching lines
added 30 characters in body
Mar
7
answered Compare two text files and find matching lines
Feb
12
answered What does the package UPower output if on a desktop
Feb
9
comment is it possibe to change parent shell's working directory programmatically?
There is actually a chance to make it "work", but it is nontrivial, error-prone and should be avoided at all costs. To show that it is actually "possible", consider this shell script where the parent is Bash: ws=$1; gdb -p $(ps h -o ppid -p $$) -ex "call chdir(\"$wd\")" -ex "call set_working_directory(\"$wd\")" -ex detach -ex q -batch. Execute as braindead-cd-parent /. You will see that pwd returns / and so does ls, etc. behave. But the prompt (PS1) is still unchanged, people's eyes are hurt, etc. So do not do this even if it is possible.
Jan
23
awarded  Benefactor
Jan
23
comment How can I open a window on a different monitor?
I awarded the bounty to you because SE would otherwise grant it to the top-voted answer while your answer better describes the issues. The current answers are still not satisfatory though.
Jan
22
comment How can I open a window on a different monitor?
It will be more like app & sleep 1; moveWindow.sh as the programs do not detach. I do not consider this an improvement over using KWin window rules though. +1 for your efforts.
Jan
22
comment How can I open a window on a different monitor?
This only works after an application has been opened, not really what I am looking for (a keybinding could probably be added for this though). If I am not mistaken, this always positions a window to the left side of a monitor?
Jan
22
comment How can I open a window on a different monitor?
This is how I do it right now, I was hoping there is a more straightforward way using envvars.
Jan
20
comment How can I open a window on a different monitor?
Thanks for explaining why this is not an easy feature. KWin also has window rules that force placement on a different screen (which is what I use now). While there is no default feature for SCREEN=x app, is it possible to add a window property in this way so that it can be filtered by KWin?
Jan
18
comment How can I open a window on a different monitor?
How odd, I saw a post about wmctrl earlier today but haven't had a chance to test it. Why was it deleted?
Jan
17
awarded  Organizer
Jan
17
revised identify files with non-ASCII or non-printable characters in file name
drop useless vim tag, add relevant character encoding and filenames tag
Jan
17
comment identify files with non-ASCII or non-printable characters in file name
@suspectus I updated by answer based on suggestions from Stephane. For LC_COLLATE and LC_CTYPE, see also the find(1) manpage.
Jan
17
revised identify files with non-ASCII or non-printable characters in file name
incorporate suggestions from Stephane
Jan
17
comment identify files with non-ASCII or non-printable characters in file name
Be aware that you have file names that are using foreign character sets that are incompatible with UTF-8 or ASCII. In those cases, you may see question marks instead of characters.