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Apr
25
awarded  Good Question
Apr
16
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
28
comment How do I remove a user from a group?
Closely related was in the sense of similar naming and purposes, I did not imply that the /etc/passwd file is actually managed by gpasswd. Note that "man page" in my first comment points to the gpasswd manual page for Fedora 13. Using gpasswd $group you can set the group password which causes the security issue you mentioned. However you can also not have a password and use gpasswd -d $user $group to delete a user as described in the first comment and accepted answer. Note that this command does not prompt for a group password nor does it modify or require it.
Mar
27
comment How do I remove a user from a group?
I understood that the utility is named gpasswd because it is closely related to /etc/passwd, but instead manages groups. Unlike the plain passwd command which just controls passwords, gpasswd can also be used to manage membership of a group. A group password is not required if you are root or a group administrator.
Mar
27
comment How do I remove a user from a group?
According to this man page, gpasswd -d bob deletethisgroup is available too. Any reason why you are not using it?
Mar
15
comment Why is egrep [wW][oO][rR][dD] faster than grep -i word?
Right, I was looking at the wrong LTS release, Ubuntu 12.04 ships with grep 2.10 while Ubuntu 14.04 includes grep 2.16.
Mar
15
comment Why is egrep [wW][oO][rR][dD] faster than grep -i word?
The author uses Ubuntu 14.04 which ships with grep 2.10. The speed of case-insensitive matches (-i) with multibyte locales should have improved in 2.17.
Mar
15
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
22
comment Why is 'ls' suddenly wrapping items with spaces in single quotes?
@LSpice It is significant. If you would execute QUOTING_STYLE=literal and ls separately, then ls will not pick this up as you are just setting a local shell variable which is not seen by the child process (ls). QUOTING_STYLE=literal ls will execute ls with the QUOTING_STYLE environment variable set for that specific execution. Compare that to export QUOTING_STYLE=literal which will make the variable available to all following child processes.
Feb
21
comment Why is 'ls' suddenly wrapping items with spaces in single quotes?
@LSpice See the bottom of every coreutils manpage, Full documentation at: gnu.org/software/coreutils/ls or available locally via: info '(coreutils) ls invocation'
Feb
16
comment Why is 'ls' suddenly wrapping items with spaces in single quotes?
@LSpice I have edited the post to use literal instead of escape (I believe that @cuonglm just wanted to show how to change the style, not specifically targetting the escape style).
Feb
16
revised Why is 'ls' suddenly wrapping items with spaces in single quotes?
Use literal instead of escape ("escape" appears to be an example, but "literal" is closer to the expectation of OP and others)
Feb
15
awarded  Pundit
Feb
10
comment Cannot set memory.memsw.limit_in_bytes in cgroup on Ubuntu server using cgm
Possibly related: unix.stackexchange.com/a/125024
Feb
9
answered Cannot set memory.memsw.limit_in_bytes in cgroup on Ubuntu server using cgm
Feb
9
accepted How can I disable the new history feature in Python 3.4?
Feb
9
answered How can I disable the new history feature in Python 3.4?
Feb
9
comment How can I disable the new history feature in Python 3.4?
This does not seem to work (Python 3.5.1 on Arch Linux), the history file is still written on exit even through the PYTHONSTARTUP script is indeed executed.
Feb
8
awarded  Famous Question