534 reputation
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location Minneapolis, MN
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visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Apr 8 at 10:18

Jul
31
answered Shell, Concatenating 2 strings to reference a 3rd variable
May
14
awarded  Yearling
Mar
23
revised Delete all but largest file of specific type
added 130 characters in body
Mar
20
comment Is it possible to use indirection for setting variables?
This isn't a good method, but your note about controlling variable names within a program is right on.
Mar
20
answered Delete all but largest file of specific type
Mar
19
comment What does ${1+“$@”} mean in a shell script, and how does it differ from “$@”?
Ah I see. <3 Mascheck pages.
Mar
19
comment What does ${1+“$@”} mean in a shell script, and how does it differ from “$@”?
Can't reproduce in Heirloom. Probably not applicable to Solaris.
Feb
23
comment Shell script Variable Structure
Thanks for showing the correct methods. First example should use ${#snapshot[@]}, ideally (( ! ${#snapshot[@]} )), though in this specific case testing the 0th element will give the illusion of working anyway.
Jan
28
revised How to stop the find command after first match?
added 31 characters in body
Jan
28
answered How to stop the find command after first match?
Jan
28
revised How to get subshell's PID in Korn Shell (equivalent of $BASHPID)
added 84 characters in body
Jan
28
answered How to get subshell's PID in Korn Shell (equivalent of $BASHPID)
Jan
23
answered $BASHPID And $$ differ in some cases
Dec
19
awarded  Critic
Dec
19
comment Storing a list in a variable
+1 Good answer. ksh88 and later do have process substitutions. mksh (and by extension, pdksh and derivatives) do not. ksh93 was not able to read a null-delimited list until just a month ago or so in the very latest alphas, while mksh and most other ksh-like shells with a read -d feature have been able to for a long time. So what works heavily depends on what ksh you're using. Finally, no ksh has declare. You should use typeset when working with anything but Bash.
Dec
8
comment Where does the “export” command come from?
whereis is a nonstandard and not very useful command. type is better, because it is a builtin and should usually tell you how a command is resolved -- as a builtin, function, or non-builtin. Unfortunately POSIX has little to say about the details of type, so you have to check your shell's manual for what options it supports. whence is another command used by some shells and is similar to type.
Dec
8
awarded  Commentator
Dec
8
answered variable assignment and IFS
Dec
5
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
29
answered Why there are multiple shells in a Unix like system?