Reputation
24,760
Top tag
Next privilege 25,000 Rep.
Access to site analytics
Badges
3 37 88
Newest
 Good Answer
Impact
~2.5m people reached

Nov
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
4
comment BASH script best practice
@Marco - thanks for noting that. It appears that's the doctrine, but there are at least some reasons not to do that. See all the answers in: stackoverflow.com/questions/21612980/…, and this question has a good dissent on that: unix.stackexchange.com/questions/29608/…
Nov
4
answered BASH script best practice
Nov
2
answered How can I reach an open & listening port on Linux?
Oct
30
answered The Apache2 configtest failed
Oct
30
answered Help with writing script that logs in and out of ssh server
Oct
27
answered How process know address of shared library?
Oct
26
comment why are directories which are empty not removed after rmdir?
Probably because the directory is not really empty - there's a hidden file or something in it. Does the rmdir give an error message? Also, GNU rmdir seems to have a flag "--ignore-fail-on-non-empty". Do you have an alias rm?
Oct
26
comment Packet forwarding under Linux shakey compared to Windows, why?
@JohnSanders - the "VM" part would have been good to know at the beginning. The next thing is "what operating system are the VMs running in?"
Oct
26
comment Packet forwarding under Linux shakey compared to Windows, why?
Not to my knowledge. I still think you should double check the cabling, and do mii-tool on the ethernet devices to see what they say. Might surprise you. Also, double check your DNS.
Oct
26
awarded  Sportsmanship
Oct
25
answered Network acting crazy… How can I know whether it's hardware?
Oct
25
answered shell script with interesting bug
Oct
25
answered Packet forwarding under Linux shakey compared to Windows, why?
Oct
21
revised Deleting an empty file, why there are so many sys calls ?
Fix up some hosed hyperlinks, and change teh to the.
Oct
21
comment Deleting an empty file, why there are so many sys calls ?
I believe, but will change my opinion if facts warrant, that the idea is every program uses a whole lot of common code. If it's already in memory, the kernel can just map that code (libc for example) into a new process, rather than reading it from disk, and using yet another page of RAM. There's also desirable side effects, like updating /usr/lib/libc.so and magically, every program has a security patch (or whatever). I don't know how much the side effects played into making everything dynamically linked.
Oct
21
answered Deleting an empty file, why there are so many sys calls ?
Oct
21
comment Using telnet to get website header
If you don't have telnet, you can get the same sort of thing using nc or netcat (distros vary in what they call it, and there's an original and GNU version in use).
Oct
21
answered Unable to receive ARP requests. Think it's a buggy driver. How to fix?
Oct
19
awarded  Good Answer