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May
15
comment pattern to install dependencies in linux
The patchlevel is supposed to be for bug fixes ( patches ) that don't break compatibility, OR add new features.
May
14
answered How to compact a directory
May
14
comment pattern to install dependencies in linux
And the reason that there are two different packages of libboost_filesystem.so is because the libboost developers screwed up and broke backward compatibility. Library maintainers are supposed to maintain backward compatibility as with all previous minor revisions so that applications written against 1.42 will work with 1.49. If you must break backward compatibility, you are supposed to do so with a major revision, then libfoo1 and libfoo2 can exist concurrently temporarily, until all apps have been fixed to work with libfoo2, then libfoo1 is removed.
May
13
comment Why was fsck priority introduced in /etc/fstab?
@trismarck, no, you put a number in the column and all partitions with a 1 get a fsck spawned at the same time to check them, then when they finish, all partitions with 2, and so on. Note that IIRC, mountall on Ubuntu and likely other distros using upstart ignore these fields and do their own figuring of what filesystems are different partitions on the same disk or not.
May
13
answered Why was fsck priority introduced in /etc/fstab?
May
11
comment Different UID/GID when using an ext4 formatted USB drive with another computer
The only security there is for removable media is physical security, or encryption. It doesn't matter what fs you use, if you give me a disk I can always plug it in and change the permissions. Being able to override it automatically is simply a matter of convenience.
May
10
comment Different UID/GID when using an ext4 formatted USB drive with another computer
Actually UDF does have posix permissions. If you don't specify the uid/gid options, it stores ownership and permissions just like ext[234] or any other posix fs. If you specify an id, the default is to translate that id to -1 when writing to the disc, and translate -1 to that id when reading from the disc. This makes it easy for a normal user to move files between systems where their id is different. A few years back I added "ignore" as a value to apply the id always, not just when it is -1 on disc, and "forget" always writes -1 to disc, whether the owner matched the default id or not.
May
10
comment Different UID/GID when using an ext4 formatted USB drive with another computer
I did some fixing of these options on udf a while back and adding them to ext[234] has been on my todo list for a while. It seems silly that you can do this with udf, and macs can do it with their hfsplus, but linux still can not with its preferred fs.
May
8
answered How i create application B that would be able to communicate with running application A?
May
7
comment How to resize an LVM partition at the beginning
is your root fs btrfs? It seems that module is a little too large to fit, but ext[234] should work fine. I've got ext4 on lvm on raid5 and that almost fits in 62 sectors. You might try making an ext4 /boot partition to get around the btrfs problem.
May
7
comment How to resize an LVM partition at the beginning
parted no longer ( since v3 ) has move/resize support, and didn't handle LVM partitions when it did.
May
7
comment How to resize an LVM partition at the beginning
You don't need to; your partition already starts on sector 63, which is typical and grub2 is quite happy with that.
May
7
comment How to convert dd disk image to Clonezilla?
@macias, neither does clonezilla; you have to resize the filesystem afterwards ( with resize2fs for ext[234] ).
May
6
awarded  Yearling
May
6
answered How to convert dd disk image to Clonezilla?
May
5
comment gparted live CD can't resize a partition?
Rather than create a new partition, you should use use parted or fdisk in sector mode to delete the existing partition, and recreate it with the exact same starting sector, but a larger size. Then run pvresize to extend the pv, and then you can use lvresize and resize2fs.
May
3
comment How can I kill a particular thread of a process?
@Lazer, one thread can not check spelling at the same time as another thread is updating the text because you are typing. Because of this, to have a background spell checking thread, it must do something like grab a lock to prevent the other thread from changing the text, make a copy of some of the words, release the lock, then check the copied words in the background. If you happened to kill it while it held the lock, you would hang the other thread as soon as you tried to type. Multithreaded applications are full of inter dependencies like this.
May
3
answered Set process exclusivity in Linux
Apr
30
comment “Remote function call interrupts” (CAL in /proc interrupts). What is it?
Without seeing the source code of the program, or at least a simplified pseudocode example, it is difficult to say what is wrong. Also what do you mean by "asynchronous IO"? If you mean posix aio, then the whole point is to be able to queue a bunch of background IO without having to create a bunch of threads. The more threads you create, the more overhead there will be, so how many threads are we talking about here?
Apr
30
comment sda and sdb block specials point to same device and get mixed up (hardware RAID doesn't work after new installation of 12.04)
dmraid does not recognize or support any such flag. In recent releases of Ubuntu, it does remove the partitions from the underlying disks when it activates the raid array ( with the -Z switch ), but the raw disk itself is still visible. This has nothing to do with a bios setting though. The bios does not even have a setting to hide component devices since the bios and windows driver always only present the virtual raid disk to the OS.